League of Legends Account Creation

Here is a quick guide to League of Legends (LoL) account creation. League of Legends is an awesome MOBA game available online. It is free to play and I guarantee that you will be hooked the moment you try it.

In LoL players are split into teams of 3-5 and get to choose a champion. They then play a match which takes between 20-40 minutes. The goal is to push past your opponents defenses and destroy their HQ (Nexus). There are currently 83 champions available in LoL but there is a new one released about every 3-4 weeks so the game never gets stale. Every single champion also has a unique set of abilities and base statistics which set them apart from all other champions and makes them unique. You also have the ability to purchase items during the match which boost your champions stats further and make them uniquely yours.

For those of you who like being able to level up your character and customize them outside of the match, LoL has you covered as well. As you play matches you will gain experience and IP. Experience increases your summoners level and IP allows you to buy new champions and runes. The max level in this game is 30. As you make your way towards level 30 you will unlock new mastery points and rune slots. You can then buy runes using your IP and assign mastery points to strengthen your character in certain areas of your choice like attack, defense, magic damage, etc.

Ready to get started?

Follow the link at the bottom of this page. It will take you to the League of Legends account creation page where you will get to choose a unique username that will identify you. This is similar to most other video games. Be aware however that the account name you sign up with is not the name you will appear under in the game. You will use this name to log into the game but that is it. After you have downloaded the game client and logged in for the first time you will get to choose your summoner’s name which is the name you will appear under to all the other people playing LoL.

You have now finished League of Legends account creation and are ready to begin playing the game. I have played a lot of video games and I have to say, LoL is one of the best games I have seen so far. So good luck and enjoy, I will see you on the battlefield summoner’s!

Compra online tu Camisetas de Futbol Barata a precios muy rebajados en futbolmania.com | Las mejores ofertas en camisetas oficiales | Devoluciones gratis.

Matt Harvey Trade Joins Short List Of Players Who Spent Time With Both Cincinnati And The Mets

The New York Mets, after over a week of speculation, have finally found a team to acquire Matt Harvey. Cincinnati agreed to ship All-Star catcher Devin Mesoraco to the Mets in exchange for Harvey, who hopes a new setting may help him overcome his struggles over the past two seasons.

The right hander enjoyed his early years with New York, making an All-Star appearance and a Cy Young runner-up while leading the Mets to the National League Championship in 2015. As good as he was for them, however, Harvey is not the most noteworthy starter the Mets have shipped to Cincinnati.

That honor belongs to a Hall of Fame pitcher who not only led New York to the pennant, but to a World Series Championship as well. Nicknamed Tom Terrific, he would be the face of a lineup comprising stars who played for both the Reds and the Mets.

Here is how it might look, excluding current players such as Todd Frazier and Jay Bruce.

Starting Pitcher, Tom Seaver

He was the ace of the staff in the Big Apple, and he later pitched a no-hitter for the Reds.

Closer, John Franco

The left hander anchored the Riverfront Stadium bullpen before the arrival of the Nasty Boys, and he also closed games for a championship Mets team.

First Base, Joel Youngblood

Besides spending time with both clubs, Youngblood is better known for being the only player to get hits in two different cities in the same day.

Second Base, Doug Flynn

Born in Reds territory, he naturally became a Cincinnati broadcaster after his playing career.

Shortstop, Tony Fernandez

His prime was spent in Toronto, but the Reds and Mets are just two of many other clubs with whom the All Star suited up.

Third Base, Ray Knight

After replacing Pete Rose at third, Knight later handled the hot corner for New York’s 1986 World Series Champions.

Left Field, George Foster

Just three years removed from his 1977 Most Valuable Player award, Foster finished his strong career for several seasons in Shea Stadium.

Center Field, Mike Cameron

He is best remembered in the Queen City as the guy used to acquire Ken Griffey Jr. from Seattle, which eventually sent him to Queens.

Right Field, Gus Bell

His best years were with Cincinnati, but he did have several solid seasons with the Mets.

Catcher, Alex Trevino

Trevino is the only player to do two stints with each team, playing for both to start his career and at the end of it.

Compra online tu Camisetas de Futbol Barata a precios muy rebajados en futbolmania.com | Las mejores ofertas en camisetas oficiales | Devoluciones gratis.

Artificial Grass in Europe

The artificial grass industry has expanded to international territories across the globe throughout the years, including Europe. With large sports industries like football (or soccer in America) and rugby, Europe has utilized artificial grass for many purposes. From Germany and the UK, to different parts of the Netherlands, artificial grass continues to be a growing trend and a popular alternative to real grass in Europe. The continent is booming with locals, tourists, and a history that dates back extensively. Traditional architecture and landmarks are of great significance to Europe. Thus, the use of artificial grass exhibits its ability to both blend in with and accommodate the European style.

Like the US, Europe takes an active approach on ecological awareness and going green. In 2007, it was noted as one of the leading continents in the global conservation movement by international media outlets. The installation of artificial grass in both public areas, as well as residential areas continues to play a large role in the continent’s going green. Its ability to save money on water and maintenance costs has helped in the financial sector, yielding its return on investment in approximately 10 years. With the aesthetic standard of natural European gardens, synthetic grass proves to look natural, and fits this clean and beautiful standard seen in many natural and historic gardens.

Artificial turf used for sports is one of the most commonly used turf products in Europe. With sports like rugby and soccer, which require a durable and safe pitch to play on, artificial turf has been a significant surface. Artificial turf for pitches has been recognized by global associations, including FIFA. The World Cup, UEFA, as well as the Champions League also recognize synthetic grass based upon extensive testing. Much like the pitches in the World Cup, a mix of natural grass, and intricately woven synthetic grass fibers make up pitches used by Liverpool FC, as well as Tottenham Hotsupur. Though not entirely made of artificial grass, this weave requires minimal maintenance, as the artificial grass blades prevent natural growth of the real grass. Athletic artificial turf thus proves to be sturdy for performance even on the professional level.

Landscaping for both private and public areas continues to increase in different parts of Europe. Many artificial grass suppliers in the UK have gained much business this summer for landscape jobs. Local gardeners and installers have been employed to do artificial turf jobs in residential areas. This is because word of mouth has boosted the trend of synthetic grass in UK neighborhoods. Aside from conserving energy, water, and money, many homeowners enjoy the versatility of synthetic grass. Landscapers this summer have worked on several jobs for households with children, customizing turf for child-friendly play. Public parks and playground projects are also increasing in popularity, as the controversy about possible health risks has been put to rest. Its adaptability and customizable aspect bolsters the popularity and boom of the artificial grass industry in Europe. From professional sports pitches to residential neighborhoods, Europe continues to benefit from the many advantages offered by modern artificial grass.

Compra online tu Camisetas de Futbol Barata a precios muy rebajados en futbolmania.com | Las mejores ofertas en camisetas oficiales | Devoluciones gratis.

League of Legends Detailed Review and Advices for Beginners

Hi community!

Today I would like to introduce to you one of the most successful free to play – games: the double Golden Joystick – winner «League of Legends» by Riot Games!

League of Legends is a MOBA-Game (Multiplayer Online Battle Arena), which is oriented towards the famous Warcraft 3 – Map «Defense of the Ancients».

For those who never played DotA (are there any?) and who don’t know the game concept I will explain it in detail:

The beginning

League of Legends doesn’t put high requirements on your PCs. You need at least:

– processor with 2 GHz – 1 GB RAM, – DirectX 9.0 capable video card, – 750 MB free hard disk space, – DSL or similar

Create an account either on the server EU West, EU Nordic/East or US, depending on where you live. You can also create an account on US while living in Europe but you will experience higher pings then. I give you a link to create an account in my author’s bio. Choose a name (always the hardest part) and a nice picture and off you go!

The Champions

There are 2 teams 5 players (there are more game modes, but they are not important in the beginning because as a newbie you should start with 5vs5 to learn the gameplay). Before every match you all choose a «champion» who is the character you want to use in battle. Dependant on your personal preferendes it can be e.g. an undead mage, a giant granite golem, a little boy riding on a Yeti, a brave knight and many more.All in all there are more than 80 (!) different champions and every second week one is added.

Every champions has 4 different abilities (3 normal and one extra strong, the «Ultimate») and a passive, which he has since the beginning. You learn the abilities by leveling up ingame and your max champion level is 18 which means that you have 5 points in every normal ability and 3 in your ultimate.

You receive experience for levelling up by:

1. Being near when enemy minions or neutral monsters are killed by your troops (it’s not necessary to kill them yourself!)

2. killing or assisting to kill enemy champions

In the beginning you generally play whatever you like, later it’s useful to communicate with your teammembers before the match begins so that you have a balanced setup and not 5 champions of the same kind.

The different kinds of champions are roughly:

1. Mages («AP Carries»: AP means ability power, they mainly deal magical damage with their abilities)

2. Fighters («AD Carries»: AD means Attack Damage, they mainly deal physical damage with their autoattacks)

3. Tanks (They are hard to kill and protect their own carries, for example by stunning or taunting the enemies)

4. Supports (They have either buffs or heals to support their carries and keep them alive)

5. Junglers (They don’t start in the lane but in the jungle and support their teammates by ganking and ambushing the enemies)

The interesting point is: Depending on the items you equip on your champions they are often able to fulfill different roles!

In the beginning you don’t have own champions, but every week there are 10 free ones which everyone can use. After some matches you can buy more champions with influence points (IP) in the shop. I will come to this later.

The map

The map has 3 different lanes, which lead from your own to the enemy base. On these lanes there are several Towers which you must destroy before you can attack the base itself. As a support your main building («Nexus») spawns minion waves in short intervals which help you in fights. Between the lanes there is the «jungle», where neutral monsters are located. If you kill those you receive gold and/or temporary buffs.

As soon as the match begins everyone has about a minute to spend his starting capital on items in the shop.

This doesn’t take long since you don’t have much gold in the beginning. There are different ways to earn gold in the game:

1. Everyone receives gold over time

2. Killing enemy minions or neutral monsters (here it is important to give them the final blow, the so called «lasthitting»)

3. Killing or assisting to kill enemy champions

4. Destroying enemy buildings (towers and inhibitors -> destroying them makes your minions stronger)

5. There are several items which grant you additional income (the so called gold/5 items -> they give you 1 gold every 5 seconds)

The goal

If you destroy the enemy main building (Nexus) your team wins. For being able to attack the Nexus, however, you have to destroy all 3 towers and the inhibitor on at least one lane and the two towers which protect the Nexus. So it’s not the best idea to hunt the enemy champions 24/7 if you don’t push the lanes at the same time. An average match takes 30-45 minutes, rarely more than an hour. As soon as the match reaches minute 20 it is also possible to surrender.

More game modes are a 3vs3 and a pretty new domination map («Dominion») where you have to capture and defend certain points. In addition there are ranked modes for players with summoner level 30 (explanation follows) in which you receive an Elo count depending on your wins and losses. For beginners I highly recommend the normal 5vs5 map!

The summoners

League of Legends also has an RPG part. You do not only choose a name and a picture for yourself (you are a so called «summoner», don’t mix it up with the «champions») but you are also able to level up yourself and buy small buffs with Influence Points (IP).

Every match you receive Experience Points (XP) and Influence Points (IP), the amount is depending on how long the match lasted, if you won or lost and if you had an active IP/XP boost. As soon as you have enough XP you level up and receive a mastery point and an additional rune space. With IP you can buy new runes and champions in the shop.

You start at level 1, the maximum summoner level is 30. Every level up you receive a mastery point which is used for buffing your champion ingame (like additional attack damage or armor). Furthermore you can buy runes with IP which have a similar effect. In one match you can use up to 30 runes (at level 30) but you can also change the runes after the match if you want to play another champion.

The last way how you as summoner have influence on your champion are the 2 summoner spells everyone chooses before the match. Those are abilities which are not connected to the champion you play and can be used at any time, for example a teleport or a heal.

To clarify this issue: Summoner = your account, Champion = the character you choose for the battle

The buffs don’t make that much of a difference but they add up and it would be pretty unfair if a player with level 30, 30 mastery points and runes would play against a beginner with level 1, no runes and 1 mastery point (not to mention the difference concerning gaming skills). That’s the reason why the system puts preferably players of a similar level together in one match. Unfortunately you can’t be sure about that because if a high level player starts a game together with a low level friend the system averages out. In this case it can happen that you have to play versus enemies with a much higher level. That’s uncool but can’t be avoided.

Riot Points (real money) Somehow Riot Games has to make money. Because of that you can buy so called «Riot Points» with real money. Those you can spend in the shop for champions, skins and other fancy stuff. Pretty much the only things you can EXCLUSIVELY buy with Riot Points and not also with Influence Points are skins (alternative looks for your champions). This means that someone who spends money for Riot Points doesn’t have the slightest advantage over someone who plays LoL for free!

To clarify again: Riot Points = bought with real money, can be spent in the shop, Influence Points = gained by playing, can be spent in the shop (not for Skins or IP/XP boosts)

LoL vs. DotA

Now that I have explained the game concept I will point out the differences between LoL and DotA:

1. There is NO «denying» (killing own minions so that the enemy can’t get gold or experience for them). This is a real change but I actually like it because it makes the game less passive (and to be honest how sick do you have to be to kill yur own soldiers?!)

2. Like already mentioned above the player himself (summoner) can also level up and get different buffs for his champions. Nice gimmick.

3. In my opinion cooldowns and manacosts are shorter/cheaper than in DotA which also leads to a more aggressive playstyle, especially in the early phase of the match.

Overall I still like to play DotA now and then because it’s just awesome but I have to say that LoL is a worthy successor, doing several things better. This is no surprise since DotA is limited to the WC 3 engine.

Advices gained in practice

I am no «pro gamer» but I play for nearly 2 years so here are some advices which shall make the start easier for you:

1. There are three tiers of runes. The first one is available right from the start, the seconds one as soon as you reach level 10 and the third one when you reach level 20. It’s pretty much waste to buy tier 1 or 2 runes since you will reach level 20 fast and there is no way to sell runes. So better only play the free champions in the beginning and save your IP for runes. If you have enough IP for buying at least one complete tier 3 rune page you can go on and buy some more champions you would like to play. You should keep in mind that it is not possible to sell champions so it would be better if you tested the champion first (e.g. when he is among the weekly free champions) to avoid disappointments.

2. Since LoL is free to play there are also some annoying fellows around. Fortunately there is a «mute»-function which makes them shut up. So don’t join their flame war if you encounter them – just mute them and go on playing in peace and harmony! The best option is to play with friends but that’s not always possible. /mute saved my life a Thousand times!

3. As long as you are new it is good to buy the recommended items for every champion. Later when you are more experienced and want to test new item builds or tactics you can find very good guides to every champion on MOBAFIRE.COM and LEAGUECRAFT.COM. I always visit them before I try out a new champion. As soon as you feel comfortable and self assured you can also visit the numerous streamers and watch how the pros are playing. I wouldn’t do it before level 30 though.

4. Nowadays many experienced players have smurf accounts. This means that you often meet enemies at your level who are far more experienced than you and kill you with ease. That is very annoying but once you are past level 5 the smurfs become less. And remember: if someone flames you, mute him, don’t give a **** and move along.

5. I strongly suggest playing the tutorial and the battle training to everybody since the basic tactics are explained there pretty well (even DotA veterans should play the battle training).

Compra online tu Camisetas de Futbol Barata a precios muy rebajados en futbolmania.com | Las mejores ofertas en camisetas oficiales | Devoluciones gratis.

Zinedine Zidane

Zinedine Zidane, the monk-like fantasista – heir to Platini’s throne as France’s greatest ever player, is also widely regarded as one of the greatest players in the history of the game. Maybe slightly overrated in some quarters when labelled with the ‘Greatest Ever’ tag, his achievements and trophy haul are certainly second to very few. For a time he was also the most expensive player in the world, costing Real Madrid a huge £46m. During his playing days Zidane became one of world football’s true superstars, and much loved players – his global fan base was (and still is) exceptional. From Europe, to North Africa (the origin of his roots) and the Middle East, to Japan – Zidane, was the man.

Zidane was born to Algerian immigrants who firstly moved to Paris, but eventually settled in La Castellane – a suburb with a huge North African community in France’s southern town of Marseille. It was here that Yazid Zidane was born in 1972. Yazid, his birth name, is what he was known by to his friends and family. The young Yazid looked to replicate his idol; Olympic Marseille’s very own fantasista, Uruguayan Enzo Franchescoli, by teaching himself tricks and repetitively juggling a football until he was better than most of the boys in the area. In a neighbourhood high in crime rate Zidane had to become tough, though this was mostly focused through Judo – something else he showed an early talent for. But it was football that won the youngsters heart. After school he would gather with the other boys from his tower block, in ‘Place Tartane’ – an 80 x 12 yard clearing in the middle of the housing complex, which served as a makeshift football pitch. By 13 years old his talent was such that he was spotted by a scout for Cannes who proclaimed: ‘I’ve found a boy who has hands where his feet should be’. After initial scepticism he was allowed to join the club’s ‘centre de formation’, leaving home and his family in the process to lodge with a club director’s family.

By 16 years old he was making his league debut versus Nantes. Then, playing the same opponents two years on, he scored his first senior league goal in a 2-1 win. Remembering the promise he made the young Zidane upon scoring his debut goal, the president rewarded him with a brand new Renault Clio. Unfortunately for the 20 year old Zizou, the Va Va Voom factor wore off pretty quick as Cannes were relegated the very next season. His skills didn’t go unnoticed however and with an offer coming in from Bordeaux, Zidane moved South for approximately £300k, where he would be reunited with his junior international team mate and close friend Christophe Dugarry. They formed part of an exciting new team that made waves in Europe as well as at home, winning the Intertoto Cup in 1995 and finishing runners-up in the UEFA Cup. It was during this period he also made his national team debut in 1994, coming off the bench whilst France were 2-0 down against the Czech Republic, and scoring twice. The press went wild – the new Platini had arrived. People outside of France were now beginning to take notice of Zidane’s attributes. The then Premiership Champions Blackburn Rovers coach Ray Harford expressed an interest in the midfielder, only for Blackburn’s owner Jack Walker to refuse, famously stating: ‘Why do you want to sign Zidane when we have Tim Sherwood?’

Zizou was a relative late bloomer on the world stage. He was already aged 24 when gaining his first major move – Juventus paying a modest £3.2m in 1996 to take him from the Bordeaux side that had starred (particularly against AC Milan) in the previous seasons UEFA Cup. Juve had chosen to snap him up before the summer’s Euro’96 competition in case of any value increase. But after his poor, lacklustre performances during the tournament, they probably saw their new commodity depreciate in value – leading Juventus president Gianni Agnelli to cuttingly remark: ‘is the real Zidane the one I’ve heard so much about, or the one I’ve been watching?’ To be fair to Zidane, he had just completed a mammoth 65-match season. Then on the eve of the Euros, he suffered a car crash. His arrival in Turin signalled more ‘new Platini’ comparisons. But after a difficult period of adjustment to the new league, murmurs of disappointment could be heard throughout the Juve faithful, leading Zidane to announce: ‘I’m Zinedine Zidane and it’s important that the fans understand that I can never be Platini, on or off the pitch.’ He was right. Zidane was a totally different character to the former Juventus number 10, and what’s more that shirt at Juve now belonged to Del Piero. Zidane’s squad number at La Vecchia Signora was 21 – an alien number to a fantasista, however after the frosty start in Turin his performances started to resemble a true fantasista. With winning goals against championship rivals Inter, and by helping Juve secure their second Intercontinental Cup in November versus River Plate, Zidane silenced his doubters. The win was made even sweeter for Zidane as he faced his teenage idol, Enzo Francescoli. The Uruguayan fantasista was ending his career back at the club where he had shot to fame. For Zidane, life couldn’t get any better.

Only it could.

That trophy was the first major of his senior career and sparked a remarkable winning period which would see him collect nearly every major trophy the sport had to offer during an incredible career. His stay at the Turin giants saw him win the Scudetto twice, a UEFA Supercup and another Intertoto Cup. During the same period with France he collected the 1998 World Cup and then followed it up with the European Championship in 2000. The only major trophy which evaded him was the Champions League. He had finished runner-up twice with Juve and now it seemed like his Holy Grail. It was probably a major factor in his decision to leave Juventus in the summer of 2001, when Real Madrid came calling and splashed out a whopping £47m for his services. The Real president Florentino Perez was embarking on his first galactico project, signing the best players in the world. And at this time, nobody was better than Zidane, having also picked up the greatest accolades any individual player could win – the Ballon d’Or in 1998, and World Player of the Year in that same year, whilst also collecting it in 2000. In 1996 when he arrived at Juventus he may have been labelled as an inferior model to the great Platini, but in 2001 he was leaving having certainly surpassed him.

In Spain, Zidane won the watching Bernabeau faithful over instantly. They adored his velvet touch and instant control. His mastery over the ball reminded their older followers of their glorious players from the past – not least their greatest ever player, Alfredo Di Stefano, who’s number 5 shirt Zidane now wore (the number 10 shirt was taken by Real’s first galactico, Luis Figo). The similarity would be greatly enhanced by the end of that season, when Zidane inspired Madrid to reach the European Cup final in Glasgow – scene of their infamous 7-3 victory in 1960 versus Eintracht Frankfurt from Germany. During that match the great Di Stefano was at the peak of his powers, scoring a hat-trick. Real’s modern day number 5 couldn’t quite emulate three goals, but scored what is considered the greatest goal in European Cup final history – a tremendous volley with his left foot (his wrong foot) from the edge of the penalty box, to lead Real to a 2-1 win over Bayer Laverkusen…from Germany. He had completed his Holy Grail.

Zidane won further trophy’s whilst in Spain, adding a La Liga championship, a UEFA Supercup and another Intercontinental Cup to his now bursting trophy cabinet. He also claimed a third World Player of the Year award in 2003, making him the joint highest ever recipient (alongside Ronaldo).

Zizou was more than a collection of awards though. To watch him play during his peak was like watching the top ballet star perform, albeit in football boots, such was his elegance and technique when controlling and gliding with the ball. His signature move, the roulette, looked like a graceful pirouette performed in the middle of a clumsy mob, leaving his midfield markers dumfounded and kicking fresh air. His attributes led Michel Platini to observe: ‘Technically, I think he is the king of what’s fundamental in the game – control and passing. I don’t think anyone can match him when it comes to controlling or receiving the ball.’ Brazilian coaching legend Carlos Alberto Parreira put it rather more bluntly, though non-the less complimentary, simply labelling him: ‘a monster!’

Unlike many of the other legendary fantasisti, Zidane wasn’t a great goalscorer, never reaching double figures in Italy or Spain. However, he was most definitely a scorer of great goals. More importantly he was a scorer of decisive goals in big games, especially on the international stage. He scored twice (two identical headers) in the 1998 World Cup final, when France beat Brazil 3-1 to win their first ever (and only) World Cup. During Euro 2000 he scored a sublime free-kick in the quarter-finals versus Spain, then, followed it up scoring a Golden Goal in the semi-final win versus Portugal. Euro 2004 saw a poor French performance but Zidane provided one of the highlights of the competition when scoring twice (a free-kick and a penalty) in injury time, turning a 1-0 defeat into a 2-1 victory versus England during the opening group game. Cementing his place as a legendary World Cup performer in 2006 Zidane scored the winner, another penalty versus Portugal in the semi-final. He then scored (another penalty) again in another World Cup final, giving France an early lead against Italy in what was his final match as a professional footballer (he had announced his retirement from the game before the tournament). Sadly for him, France lost that game. Even sadder was the fact that Zidane wasn’t able to stay on the pitch until the final whistle – having received a red card. Unfortunately for Zizou, red cards also form part of his legend.

As a playmaker Zidane’s expression was all in his creative flair and artistry. However, during his career he was no stranger to some unsavoury incidents on the football pitch. Zidane was sent-off a massive 12 times during his career (including five times at Juventus and twice whilst at Real Madrid) – mostly for retaliation. These violent flashpoints were in direct contrast to his perceived cool persona as he glided around the field, though his brooding, often moody stare also served as a warning; he was a player who would not be bullied. His response to provocation was first noted during his younger days at Cannes. Whilst he never started any trouble, he knew how to take care of himself. As Richard Williams deftly puts it in his excellent book ‘The Perfect 10’, he would respond: ‘in a way that might be expected from a boy formed in a tough quarter of a hard-nosed city, where an injury might be repaid with a headbutt’. Fast forward 18 years and Marco Materazzi was living testament that age had not mellowed Zidane’s own sense of personal justice – a flying headbutt to the Italian’s chest in response to alleged provocation during the 2006 World Cup final. His last act as a professional footballer.

Many forget however, that this was not Zizou’s first red card during a World Cup tournament. Indeed during France’s triumphant World Cup victory in 1998 it is very easy to forget, in all the hysteria of his two headed goals in the final, that he was briefly a French villain. During the second group game versus Saudi Arabia, the balding fantasista inexplicably lost his cool and stamped on the back of the Saudi captain whilst he was lay on the ground after a challenge. It left the watching world mystified, as this time Zidane’s brand of personal justice seemed to come without any direct provocation. The French poster-boy was given a two match suspension, putting ‘Les Bleus’ campaign in jeopardy – the then captain Didier Deschamps summing up the nervous feeling of the nation: ‘I know he’s impulsive, but he’s put us all at risk’. Indeed without Zidane, the French struggled (eventually winning) in their last-16 tie versus Paraguay – which is testament to the effect Zizou had on the national team. This would become a worrying noticeable feature of all the French teams for the next decade; such was Zidane’s stature and ability. With him, they were world beaters, without him they looked also rans. During qualification for the 2006 finals, the French (without Zidane who had announced his international retirement in 2004) almost failed to qualify. Zidane (along with Thuram and Makelele) answered the call to help out his country and was immediately reinstated as captain. In doing so he instantly rejuvenated the French who went on to reach the (ill-fated) final of the tournament – along the way knocking out previous and future champions Brazil and Spain, with Zidane in imperious form and winning the competition’s Most Valuable Player award.

So with this fantasista, we had the beauty and the beast. The grace and the violence. Taking the rough with the smooth, he was one hell of a player – maybe Parreira had described him best after all…he was a monster!

Bio

Born: 23rd June 1972 in Marseille (France)

Height: 1.85m / 6ft 1″

Career

1988-1992: Cannes – 61 apps / 6 goals

1992-1996: Bordeaux – 139 apps / 28 goals

1996-2001: Juventus – 151 apps / 24 goals

2001-2006: Real Madrid – 155 apps / 37 goals

Totals: 506 app / 95 goals

1994-2006: France – 108 caps / 31 goals

Honours

World Player of the Year: 1998, 2000, 2003

Ballon D’Or: 1998

FIFA World Cup: 1998

UEFA European Championship: 2000

UEFA Champions League: 2002

UEFA Supercup: 1996, 2002

Intercontinental Cup: 1996, 2002

Serie A Champions: 1997, 1998

La Liga Champions: 2003

Compra online tu Camisetas de Futbol Barata a precios muy rebajados en futbolmania.com | Las mejores ofertas en camisetas oficiales | Devoluciones gratis.

Conspicuous By Their Absence: David Beckham – Romario – Raul – Sunday Oliseh – Roy Keane

It always provokes a reaction from fans of national teams whenever their favourite players’ names are excluded from the squad to play in any match or to participate in a major tournament. Every fan is an expert, an Alex Ferguson who can give you a million reasons why player A should have been included in the squad.

In reality, football is a lot more complex than that. Some players might excel in their clubs because of the position they are being played in and, or because of the formation the club manager adopts often. The national team manager might adopt a different type of formation or they might not have vacancy in their squad to fit the player in a position that would fully maximise his potentials and ultimately lead to team success which in effect is the end game.

A lot more factors go into this of course. Some can easily be explained in a press conference and reasons given understood and appreciated if not accepted. Others could however be shrouded in mystery and attempts at explaining why player A has been dropped, for instance, could give rise to more questions being asked. Nicholas Anelka’s omission from various French squads over the years could easily be explained as him not getting on with the National team handlers and also disciplinary issues.

However, Mario Jardel’s sparse invitations to the national team of Brazil between 1994 and 2002 when he was one of the most prolific strikers in Europe left many questions unanswered. At some point, he was the highest goal scorer in Europe for two seasons in a row between 1998 and 2000. Naturally, people came to their own conclusions. Some said ‘his style of play was too European to fit into the South American samba style that Brazil adopted’. Whatever the reasons, it would be reasonable to assume that a Striker of his calibre should have been given more opportunities to represent his country.

Below, I have compiled a list of five notable names of players who were conspicuous by their absence when squad lists were released, furnished with some background information.

These are David Beckham, Romario, Raul, Sunday Oliseh and Roy Keane.

David Beckham of England (2006): Steve McClaren took over as England manager after the departure of beleaguered coach Sven Goran Eriksson in 2006. As he unveiled his first squad for a friendly against Greece on 16 August 2006, David Beckham’s name was conspicuously missing.

McClaren made it clear he was ‘out for change’ and that Beckham – for the moment at least – ‘wasn’t part of the change.’ McClaren hinted he favoured wingers with pace who could run at defenders, move with the ball and cause different kinds of problems.

Beckham would however make a return to the England squad when qualification for Euro 2008 was in jeopardy. It was his sublime cross that in fact picked out Peter Crouch who chested and volleyed to make it 2:2 against Croatia in the final qualifying match at Wembley Stadium on 21 November 2007. He had come in as a substitute for Shaun Wright-Phillips. England would however lose 2:3 and miss out on the tournament with the coach being criticized – among other reasons – for not playing Beckham from the start; he was promptly sacked.

David Beckham’s contributions at Manchester United had marked him out as a future star and he was first called up to the England squad on 1 September 1996 to play against Moldova. He however became somewhat of a public enemy number one when he petulantly got himself sent off against bitter rivals Argentina at the second round of the World cup in France 1998. He was seen kicking Argentine player Simeone while lying on the floor; he was shown his marching orders. England would later lose on penalties with Beckham apparently taking the bulk of the blame from an angry British press and a hurting public.

Time is a great healer and in time, Beckham started to warm his place back into the hearts of the British press and the English public. He started turning out consistent and occasional brilliant performances for both club and country. He played a pivotal role in the Manchester United squad that historically won the treble of the FA cup, Premier League and Champions league in the 1998-99 season. He scored United’s last goal in the last game of that season against Tottenham Hotspurs and also delivered both corner kicks that led to United’s remarkable comeback against Bayern Munich at the Champions league final to win 2:1 after trailing at 0:1 up until 90 minutes.

His redemption for England was complete when his ‘bend it like Beckham’s’ fabulously taken free kick against Greece on 6 October 2001 ensured that the English flag would be flown at the FIFA World Cup in Japan and South Korea 2002. England needed at least a draw in their final group match to qualify for the mundial but were losing 1:2 at Old Trafford Manchester, much to the frustration of their fans. At about 91 minutes, Teddy Sheringham – who had made it 1:1 for England earlier – was judged to have been fouled from outside the 18 yard box. Up stepped Mr. David Beckham who courageously volunteered to take the resulting free-kick and curled it neatly behind the wall into the net. The Greek goalkeeper, Nikopolidis Antonis, was reduced to a mere spectator as he could only watch the ball lodge into the back of the net. The whole stadium erupted in scenes of joy and jubilation that would have been equally felt by fans watching from television screens in Pubs up and down the country and those watching on telly in the comfort of their homes.

His marriage to Victoria Adams of popular British female pop group Spice Girls on 4 July 1999 has created a global brand – via their celebrity lifestyle, public persona, business interests and marriage longevity which is thus far blessed with four children – which has brought immense pride to the nation.

David Beckham is at the twilights of his career and now plays his club football for California outfit LA Galaxy in the United States. He has hinted that he would love to play for team GB (Great Britain) at next year’s summer Olympics to be held in London, England; he would be 37 years old by then. Beckham should temper his ambitions of wanting to win a major tournament with England with the reality that he doesn’t really ‘bend it like Beckham’ as he used to.

Romario (full name: Romario de Souza Faria) of Brazil (1998 and 2002): Named as one of the top 125 greatest living footballers by FIFA, few would forget how Romario inspired Brazil to win the 1994 FIFA world cup in the United States. He scored five goals in that tournament and won the World Cup golden ball.

Despite his immense skills and breathtaking goals, his name would be conspicuously missing from Brazil’s squads to participate in the 1998 and 2002 FIFA World Cup tournaments.

Medical reasons were given for his exclusion from the team to participate at the France ’98 world cup. He had been prolific for Brazil leading up to the tournament. In February 1998, he scored one goal each against Guatemala and El Salvador respectively. He cried in a press conference on 02 June 1998 held in Lesigny, France and fans were visibly upset when talking about the fact he would not be at the mundial. «This is very sad for me, a big disappointment,» he said. «This is a very difficult moment in my life. From now on, I will start to give value to other things. I just want to thank the national team for having given me the chance to become what I am.» He broke down and wept several times before been led away to a standing ovation.

The story went that medical tests revealed he had muscular lesion on the back of his lower leg and that this might – or might not – heal in time for or during the tournament. The decision was taken by the national team handlers for him to be dropped, much to the dismay of vast majority of Brazilians. Brazil would reach the final eventually losing to host France in a one-sided final which ended 3:0.

Indiscipline is thought to be the reason for dropping the 36 year old Romario from the squad that represented Brazil at the 2002 world cup held in Japan and Korea. He had in fact been in consistent form for club and country leading up to the tournament. He netted four goals against Venezuela in a world cup qualifying and had netted three against Venezuela a month earlier in 2000. He had formed a formidable partnership with the legendary Ronaldo. Brazil would in his absence go on to win the tournament, beating a gallant German side 2:0.

Just like four years earlier, Brazilians had been massively disappointed by his exclusion. The coach, Phil Scolari vigorously defended his decision to leave the player out. He maintained that he had faith in the strikers he had selected, that it was him and not 170 million Brazilian fans that was the coach of the National team, and win or lose, he was ready to face the consequences of his decisions.

Romario remains a legend of Brazilian football having won the FIFA World Cup in 1994; the Confederation Cup in 1997; and the Copa America in 1989 and 1997 respectively with the national team. He remains a household name in football circles worldwide. He is into politics these days.

Raul ( full name: Raul Gonzalez): After having scored 23 goals in all competitions for Real Madrid in the 2007 – 2008 season and played a role in qualifying Spain for Euro 2008, one could be forgiven to assume that – injury permitting – Raul would automatically make the squad for the tournament. This assumption would have been misplaced as Raul’s name was conspicuously missing from the final squad.

A lethal striker, Raul scored 44 goals for Spain between 1990 and 2006 and currently holds the record as Spain’s most capped outfield player with about 102 appearances thus far. As talented as he is however, he unfortunately belongs to a generation of Spanish players that were seen as perennial underachievers in major tournaments, often displaying a gap between potentials and performance. For instance, a lot was expected of him and his teammates at the 1998 FIFA world cup in France. They however crashed out of the first round winning only one match. In Euro 2000 co-hosted by Belgium and the Netherlands, Spain reached the quarter finals but lost 1:2 to World cup champions France with Raul missing a last minute penalty that, if scored, would have forced the match to extra time. Raul along with Fernando Morientes and Joan Capdevila were part of the talented but hapless Spanish squad that failed to progress beyond the group stages at the Euro 2004 tournament held in Portugal.

A new generation of Spanish players have now emerged that have effectively shed the image of the past. This so-called golden generation includes players like Fernando Torres, David Villa, Cesc Fabregas and Xabi Alonso. They have already won the European Championship (Euro 2008) and the FIFA World Cup (South Africa 2010) both tournaments which Raul was eligible but ignored. Loss of form is thought to be the reason he was excluded from the squads to participate in both tournaments.

It would appear the emergence of promising young players like, Alvaro Negredo of Sevilla and Pedro Rodriguez of Barcelona continues to account for Raul’s exclusion from the national team. The likes of Torres and Villa were preferred to him between 2008 and 2010. It is then reasonable to conclude that Luis Aragones and Vicente Del Bosque – two national team Managers who have recently overlooked him – wanted a break from the past, seeking a fresh new perspective and outlook for the Spanish national team, after all, one cannot continue to do the same thing the same way and expect to get a different result.

Raul who to his credit has never been issued a red card in his career thus far presently plays for German club Schalke 04. He remains a prolific striker and has already scored 3 hat- tricks in club he joined less than two years ago. He remains the record goal scorer in the EUFA champions league with 71 goals.

At the age of 34, a return to the Spanish national team is not beyond the realms of possibilities. However, with each passing day and the emergence of young, bright, energetic and talented Spanish strikers, these possibilities appear to become more and more remote.

Sunday Oliseh of Nigeria (2002): Shakira – South American music sensation – said in one of her songs that her ‘hips don’t lie’. Well, Sunday Oliseh’s feet were not lying when his right foot released a ferocious shot from outside the 18 yard box that drilled home a 3:2 lead and victory for Nigeria against Spain at the FIFA World Cup France 1998. Feet as well don’t lie.

Incidentally, that goal would be Oliseh’s last World Cup goal and France 1998 his last World cup appearance for his country. Despite being available for selection to participate at the World cup in 2002 to be held in Japan and South Korea, his name was conspicuously missing when Nigeria’s squad to participate in the tournament was released.

Oliseh had played a pivotal role in qualifying Nigeria for the mundial in 2002. He was solid in his defensive midfield role as his country qualified from a group the included legendary George Weah’s Liberia and bitter West African rivals Ghana. Nigeria amassed 16 points to narrowly edge out Liberia on 15 points. Several big name players including Finidi George and Victor Ikpeba would – along with Oliseh – however be excluded from Nigeria’s World cup squad.

Oliseh had become a darling of Nigerian football, loved and adored at home; well known and respected abroad. He played his first game for the Super Eagles of Nigeria on 24 July 1993 in an African Cup of Nations qualifying match against Ethiopia played Lagos Nigeria. For almost 10 years, he made the defensive midfield position in the national team his private property from where he dictated play and shelled out passes. He was both a creative and a destructive defensive midfielder; creating chances for his team mates with clever short and long range passes on one hand and nipping opponents attacking moves from the bud on the other hand often with neat and timely tackles. He was quite simply a joy to watch.

In 1998, he prematurely retired from international football but was persuaded by pleas from the press, millions of Nigerian fans and the NFA (Nigerian Football Association) to ‘please come back!’ He rescinded and led Nigeria to second place at the African Cup of Nations held jointly by Nigeria and Ghana in 2000.

Indiscipline was the reason given for his exclusion from the squad to participate at the World Cup in Japan and Korea in 2002. It was reported that Oliseh – along with other senior members of the squad including Finidi George – had a dispute with Nigerian football officials which unduly distracted the team from performing well at the African cup of Nations held earlier the same year in Mali. This is thought may have contributed to the team’s overall poor showing at the tournament. They however came third. The dispute was over unpaid allowances and air ticket refunds.

Festus Onigbinde who was appointed coach after the African Cup of Nations immediately dropped Oliseh from the provisional 35 man squad released in preparations for the World Cup. There were signs he might be recalled for the tournament proper but this never happened. He retired from international football soon afterwards and this time, it was for good.

In his absence, the Super Eagles of Nigeria crashed out of the tournament at the first round, losing their first two matches to Argentina and Sweden respectively and played out a rather boring goalless draw against England in their final group match.

Oliseh retired from football in January 2006 and now maintains his own website named http://www.sundayoliseh.tv from where he shares his knowledge of football with the world. He recently commented on Nigeria’s failure to qualify for the African cup of Nations in 2012 hinting that this ‘sends out the wrong signals about Nigeria’s place in African football.’

Roy Keane of Republic of Ireland (2002): Not in a long time had Irish football had a larger than life character like Roy Keane. He had played a pivotal part in the midfield in qualifying Ireland for the FIFA world cup in 2002 but his name was conspicuously missing from the Irish squad to participate in the tournament.

Ireland had qualified for the 2002 mundial quite impressively from a group that included European heavyweights Portugal and The Netherlands. They in fact went through the entire qualifying stage undefeated and only came second behind Portugal by virtue of goals difference. Keane had been solid in the heart of the Irish midfield often with ‘man of the match’ performances. He also scored 3 goals in the qualifying campaign.

He however missed the tournament due to a rift between him and the FAI (Football Association of Ireland). He was disappointed at what he saw as Ireland’s inadequate preparations for the World Cup. He was unhappy about the travel arrangements, the training pitch, training facilities and late arrival of the squad’s training equipments among others. It all came to a head when the coach, Mick McCarthy decided to have a word with Keane – in front of other team members – about a recent interview he had given to The Irish Times expressing his views about the Irish team’s preparations. Keane used that opportunity to tell the coach exactly what he felt about him. He said that Mick McCarthy was ‘a liar,’ that he ‘never rated him as a player and that he did not rate him as a coach’ either. He ranted and swore for about ten minutes as he told the coach to ‘stick it up his bullocks,’ according to sources. One player present had described Keane’s tirade as fierce and earth shattering to its recipient.

The Coach moved swiftly and announced shortly after in a press conference the Keane had been dismissed from the Squad. In his absence, the Republic of Ireland would reach the second round only to lose 3:2 on penalties to Spain after the match had ended 1:1 after extra time.

Roy Keane is a Manchester United and an Irish football legend. He had contributed to Ireland’s fine FIFA World cup participation at USA in 1994 as they reached and were eliminated at the second round by an industrious Dutch side after having impressively beaten tournament favourites – Italy – 1:0 at the group stages. Their second round elimination notwithstanding, they received heroes welcome at the homecoming celebration held at Phoenix Park in Dublin from patriotic and delighted Irish Fans with Irish flags been waved joyfully in the air. Roy Keane was singled out for his immense contributions although he thought there was not much to celebrate about as the team had – in his words -‘achieved little’.

He made about 480 appearances for Manchester for just over a decade. A powerful central/defensive midfielder, his style of play was uncompromising. He would usually approach any match like a soldier going to war. From his position, he was able to dictate the tempo and pattern of play, not shy lounge into tackles to disrupt opponents attacking initiatives and would often beseech his teammates to push forward and never give up. His winning mentality endeared him to his coach Sir Alex Ferguson.

He famously revealed in his autobiography how he deliberately set out to hurt another player – Alf -Inge Haaland – after nursing grudge against him for about four years. «I had waited long enough» he said. «I hit him f******g hard». He received a further fine from the English Football Authorities for his confession.

Roy Keane has taken to a career in coaching after retiring from football in 2006. He currently manages Ipswich Town.

Compra online tu Camisetas de Futbol Barata a precios muy rebajados en futbolmania.com | Las mejores ofertas en camisetas oficiales | Devoluciones gratis.

Soccer Psychology – The Difference Between Winning and Losing

In today’s game of soccer most would argue that the most important person in a team is the coach. But a new position has arisen from the depths of the grandstand and his importance has significantly increased. Can you guess who it is?

Big clubs all over the world are employing Sports psychologists for help and some have even put them on as full time staff. Sports psychology has become the next boom industry as clubs and coaches have discovered the power of soccer psychology.

The difference between winning and losing at the highest level can be separated by a thin white line. All players are extremely fit, skillful, strong and quick. But how many players are confident and mentally strong? Clubs have discovered this and have added psychology to their growing list of weapons.

Players these days have pushed their physical capabilities to the limit and the competitive edge has virtually flattened out. That’s until mental warfare stepped in with the arrival of soccer psychology.

Science has proven that psychology and the right mindset influences and improves soccer performance. Sports psychology also identifies weaknesses and offers counseling to players who might be suffering from a lack of confidence and low self-esteem. They can also monitor motivational levels within a team and assess the whole team on an individual basis.

Soccer psychologists can also identify the different personalities within the team and ensure that these personalities don’t clash and work together. Remember, a champion team will always beat a team of champions. Soccer psychologists make the transition from a team to a championship team look very simple. By correcting the mindset of the players and increasing the player’s confidence the dream of winning silverware becomes a reality.

Soccer over the years has claimed its fair share of victims. Players that have lost all confidence and cannot perform at the levels required have inevitably been shown the door at their respective clubs. How can we stop this? Most players that have lost their confidence also suffer from low self esteem. With low self esteem comes the nerves and anxiety. If you have this problem within your team, the use of a soccer psychologist will solve all your problems. They will help your players relax and also use mental imagery to build on their shattered confidence without even touching a soccer ball.

Sports psychology has been directly linked to team spirit. The greater the team spirit, the greater chance you have of winning trophies. That’s why we see the smaller clubs of Europe beating some of the heavy weights in the champion’s league. Are the players better at the smaller clubs? Or do they have team spirit? From watching the champion’s league, it’s clearly evident what the smaller clubs lack in talent they make up in spirit and confidence.

The main purpose of psychology in soccer is to prevent the players feeling like failures when they lose. By eliminating this feeling, psychologists are protecting the players self esteem. Could self esteem and confidence be the secret ingredient all the big clubs share?

Compra online tu Camisetas de Futbol Barata a precios muy rebajados en futbolmania.com | Las mejores ofertas en camisetas oficiales | Devoluciones gratis.

Footballer Profile – Robinho

Robson de Souza – known throughout the footballing world as Robinho – was perhaps the biggest surprise addition to Manchester City’s squad in their much publicised quest to enter British football’s elite. When the Brazilian signed from Real Madrid on the last day of the transfer window in the summer of 2008, it made everyone aware of the seriousness of the new club owners’ intentions. This was a genuine superstar coming to the City of Manchester Stadium.

Robinho has always been earmarked for great things – even the incomparable Pelé eulogised about him as a fifteen year old. Playing for the famous Santos club which the legendary Pelé had represented for so long, ‘Robi’, who had been born in Sao Paulo in 1984, quickly became their goalscoring talisman. The kidnapping from her home of his mother in the 2004/05 season, though, had a real impact on his life – even though she was released unharmed it then seemed inevitable that he would leave the country and join other prominent Brazilian players in Europe. At the end of the 2004/05 season, the player was named as the World Soccer Young Player of the Year.

The move came in July, 2005, when Robinho signed for Real, going on to score 10 goals in his first season. Although his undoubted skill was always evident at this time, it was also clear the player was having difficulties adapting to life, and the different style of football, at his new club. With Fabio Capello and, later, Bernd Schuster, Robinho was never really a regular starter for the Spanish team, even though he continued to be in the Brazil team.

The player’s time in Spain came to a distasteful conclusion. Madrid tried to include Robinho as a ‘makeweight’ in the transfer of Cristiano Ronaldo from Manchester United, against the player’s wishes. When the deal fell through and the Madrid hierarchy decided to offer him a new contract, Robinho refused it.

Despite looking as if he was about to sign for Chelsea, Robinho ended up at Eastlands and Manchester City, seemingly encouraged to join the club because they already had two other Brazilians on the books, Elano and Jo.

Since signing for Manchester City, Robinho has become very popular with the supporters – a popularity helped when he was seen with his wife going into the city on a bus! Many critics felt, during his first season, that his performances were very much better in games at Eastlands than in matches played away from home. Despite this, he scored 15 goals in 41games. This season, however, with the squad having been greatly boosted with the acquisition of more high class players, Robinho has been the victim of a bad ankle injury picked up playing for Brazil and so has missed most of the fixtures.

With Brazil, Robinho remains an important member of the team, scoring 19 goals so far in his 71 internationals, and he is almost certain to be integral in Brazil’s attempts to win the World Cup in South Africa in the summer.

For whom Robinho will be playing then is really anybody’s guess! Ever since his arrival, it seems he has been linked with moves away. Manchester City continually deny that he is on his way to Barcelona, Chelsea or any other number of clubs. City fans, certainly, will be hoping to see the skilful little striker linking up with Adebayor and Tevez to help the club realise their ambitions and qualify for next season’s Champions League.

Who Knows? If they do succeed, then perhaps Robinho might be there again next season.

Compra online tu Camisetas de Futbol Barata a precios muy rebajados en futbolmania.com | Las mejores ofertas en camisetas oficiales | Devoluciones gratis.

La Liga Rules for Non-European Players

La Liga or La Liga BBVA is the top-level professional club football competition in Spain. It is considered one of the most popular as well as competitive domestic leagues throughout the world, with English Premier League, Bundesliga, Serie A and Ligue 1 being other most viewed national leagues. Just like every football league in the world, La Liga is also guided by specific rules as prepared by the Spanish football authority in alignment with the FIFA guidelines. Let us now take a closer look at the La Liga rules for the non-EU players.

Rules for Non-European Players in La Liga

According to the rules in La Liga, a club playing in the top division Spanish football league is not allowed to recruit more than three non-EU players. The same figure is 2 for the second division football clubs (LigaAdelate). The clubs in the Segunda Division B are not allowed to recruit any non-EU player. The clubs relegated to the second or third division are, however, permitted to retain the non-EU players until their contracts expire.

According to a decision adopted by the Spanish Federation, the teams playing in La Liga and the second division football in the country should make an optimum use of the rules and construct their squads with the foreign payers as many as permissible by the authority.

Citizenship for Foreign Players

As per La Liga rules, the players can claim citizenship of Spain from their native lands. A non-European player can apply for Spanish citizenship. However, he must play for five years in Spain in order to be eligible for Spain citizenship. Furthermore, the players arriving from Caribbean, African and the Pacific counties (commonly referred to as ACP countries) are not included in the non-EU category due to the Kolpak Ruling.

Arsenal

From La Liga, we will head our way towards English Premier League side Arsenal. Fondly called as the Gunners, they are one of the most successful Premier League sides in England. Currently managed by Arsene Wenger, Arsenal have their own home ground at the Emirates Stadium. They have produced some of the big names in the world football and attracted several top-tier players to London.

Achievements by Arsenal

Arsenal has a good number of silverware in their collection. The club has won Premier League titles 13 times. They won their last Premier League title in 2004 and currently lead the league table to make it 14 in their profile. They have won FA Cup 12 times in their history and lifted FA Community Shield.

Arsenal honors are not limited to only achievements within domestic field but also extended to international level. They have won UEFA Champions League as well as former UEFA Europa League (Former UEFA Cup). They are also the winner of FIFA Club World Cup and UEFA Super Cup. In 1994, Arsenal wrapped up UEFA Cup Winners Cup.

Arsenal has several stars on their board. They brought German International Mesut Ozil from Real Madrid on a club record deal in summer of 2013.

Compra online tu Camisetas de Futbol Barata a precios muy rebajados en futbolmania.com | Las mejores ofertas en camisetas oficiales | Devoluciones gratis.

Short Biography of Famous Soccer Player – Lothar Matthaus

His full name is Lothar Herbert Matthaus. He was born in Erlangen, West Germany on 21 March 1961. He is a German ex- soccer player and at this time manager, last managing Israeli club Maccabi Netanya. His playing position in the field is as an Attacking Midfielder or Defensive Midfielder.

Lothar Matthaus is one of the most successful players ever in world football. He began his career in a local club called FC Herzogenaurach. Matthaus made his World Cup first appearance in the 1982 tournament. He played the role as a midfield support player, appearing in a few games.

Lothar Matthaus was labeled European Footballer of the Year and World Soccer Player of the Year In 1990, after captaining West Germany to triumph in the 1990 World Cup. One year later, he was also entitled the first ever FIFA World Player of the Year.

He has played in five World Cups (1982, 1986, 1990, 1994, and 1998) and holds the record for the most World Cup matches played (25 games). He won Euro 1980, and played in Euro 1984, Euro 1988, and Euro 2000. In 1999, he was again chosen German Footballer of the Year.

Matthaus is a member of the FIFA 100 – a list of 125 of the greatest living soccer players selected by Pelé.

In December 2002 Matthaus was signed by Partizan Belgrade. Matthaus attained the essential success and his bright moments came in August 2003 when Partizan beat Newcastle United in the 3rd qualifying round to get to the 2003/04 Champions League. Matthaus left his post at Partizan in December 2003 and signed becoming a coach for Hungarianry national team. Afterward, on 11 January 2006 Matthaus signed a one-year agreement to be a coach of Atletico Paranaense of Brazil. Matthaus was signed as coach of Red Bull Salzburg on May 19, 2006 in common with Trapatonni for the 2006/2007 season.

Compra online tu Camisetas de Futbol Barata a precios muy rebajados en futbolmania.com | Las mejores ofertas en camisetas oficiales | Devoluciones gratis.