Barefoot Training For Soccer Players Increases Their Speed and Explosiveness

Do you want to get faster and more explosive on the soccer field? Would you like to lower the risk of getting injured? If so, keep reading!

Many soccer teams that I train or athletes that I work with share a common trait when they warm up…they all warm up in their bare feet. Here is the reason for that. By wearing shoes all the time, we are not strengthening the small muscles in the foot as well as we could. Shoes obviously serve a purpose, but try warming up your team without their shoes on and by doing this you will start to strengthen all of those small muscles in the feet, you will also help to strengthen the joints and ligaments in the ankle and lower leg as well.

I have written before about the Active Dynamic Warm up (ADW). If players do their ADW (series of exercises to warm their core body temperature up and then stretch dynamically) before their practice starts, they will in effect be doing themselves a huge favor.

Since soccer players (and most athletes) use their feet so much to not only play the sport of soccer but to be athletic too, training their feet to get stronger will absolutely increase their soccer speed, make them stronger which in turn will make them more explosive and will also reduce the number of lower leg injuries as well.

While I know this example is a bit of a reach, if you consider it, then you can see how barefoot training can effect your feet. Alright, so here is the example. If you wore baseball gloves on your hands for 2 weeks and did your normal routine, when you took the baseball gloves off and then tried to open a brand new jar of peanut butter, you probably couldn’t do it. The small muscles in your hand got weaker since you didn’t use them fully. The same thing applies when you wear shoes.

If you do a barefoot warm up, please make certain to clear the area of any rocks or sticks or anything that could injure a players foot. If you train indoors, then this issue is greatly reduced.

Just 15 minutes of barefoot training will help soccer players generate more speed, increase their agility and help to reduce lower leg and foot injuries.

I hope you have a great day!

Camiseta Stadium de la tercera equipación del Chelsea 2018-19 para niños Camiseta Stadium de la tercera equipación del Chelsea 2018-19 para niños

When Soccer Came to Brazil

The history of Brazilian soccer is a disorganized one and it comes as no surprise that its origins has many a version! This British sport is said to have arrived in Brazil during the end of the nineteenth century.

One version of the advent of soccer in Brazil claims it all started with the arrival of British and Dutch sailors to the country. The locals learned the routes of the game from these sailors on the beaches of the north eastern coastline. Another version gives credit to a certain Mr. Hugh as the 'father of Brazilian soccer'. It sees Mr. Hugh was the first person to teach the game to the workers of the São Paulo Railway back in 1882. Yet another version prefers a Mr. John as the first coach of soccer, who taught the skills to a team of Leopoldina Railway workers sometimes in 1875.

Now, if that's not confusing, what is it? Well, there's one more version that most people espouse as the 'true story'. According to this popular version, Brazilian soccer owes Charles William Miller for bringing the game to the country. Born in Brazil in the year 1874, Charles left for England for his studies at the age of 10. It was there that he was first came in contact with the sport. Charlie was a natural and soon became a deft dribbler and a free kick and header specialist. An accomplished striker, he won school honors that cave him entry into Southampton Club, and later, the Hampshire County team.

On his return to Brazil in 1894, he bought with him some soccer gear, a rule book and his skill. He formed the first Brazilian football club, the Sao Paolo Athletic Club (SPAC), and even came up with a few new rules! SPAC went on to win the first three championships with Mr. Miller at the helm. His football skills were far superior than his team mates and the 'Chaleira' – a football move invented by him saw him flick the ball with his heel – was named in honor of him. This move is still used by the legends of Brazilian football! The greatest names of the game, Pele, Socrates and Rivelino owe a lot to this pioneer of Brazilian football …

The first official match in Brazil was played in São Paulo back in 1894. Charles Miller had invited the English football teams from Southampton and the Corinthians Club to play against SPAC and other local teams. Charles had so much respect for the Corinthians sense of fair play, he even named a local team after them! And with that, one of Brazil's most popular club was born … It went on to become Brazilian Champion in the year 2005 and had some of the best players Brazil has seen on its roster.

In 1988, SPAC commemorated its centenary with a match against the English Corinthians! The final match had legends like Socrates and Rivelino on the local Corinthian side playing against their English العربية. The local team was leading 1: 0, when Socrates, in the spirit of Corinthian fairness, agreed to change his soccer jersey to play for the English team!

Well, those were the early years of Brazil's love affair with football. It went on to make history as five time World Cup champion and is the only country to have qualified for all 17 World Cups in the tournament's history! Until 2002, Brazil had lost only one World Cup qualifier in 70 years of playing! With its elegant dribbling, lightening speed passes and precision scoring, Brazilian Futebol has been likened to ballet dancing, and more recently, to the rhythmic samba!

FIFA World Cup Background

The FIFA World Cup has taken place every four years since its first tournament in 1930 – with the exception of 1942 and 1946 due to World War II – between the senior men’s national soccer teams of the Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA). Since its inaugural tournament, the FIFA World Cup – now also known as the Soccer World Cup, the Football World Cup, or simply the World Cup – has become the most widely viewed sports championship in the world, with an even larger television audience than the Olympic Games.

Since 1977 FIFA has also organized youth equivalents of the international tournament, as well as club football equivalents and equivalents for soccer variations including futsal and beach soccer. In 1991, FIFA also introduced a women’s soccer equivalent to the World Cup, called the FIFA Women’s World Cup, the first of which took place in the People’s Republic of China between twelve nations and was won by the United States and which now takes place between sixteen teams over the course of three weeks.

When the world’s first international soccer match had taken place in 1872, in Glasgow between Scotland and England, the creators of the game – as well as by the time the first international soccer tournament, the first British Home Championship, had taken place twelve years later in 1884 between Scotland and Ireland – the sport had still yet to gain much international attention and was played very little outside of the U.K. Nevertheless, the beginnings of soccer’s international popularity were budding. As other nations did come to acknowledge the sport in the years that followed, it was still only regarded as a demonstration sport, especially when it came to the Olympic Games; during the 1900 and 1904 Olympics, it was played as an event, but without the awarding of any medals.

In 1904, the Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) was founded in Paris as an official, organized international governing body that would represent the interests and advancement of soccer worldwide, and among its first orders of business was to attempt to establish a truly international soccer tournament outside of the context of the Olympics, although it took years for them to successfully achieve that goal. The World Cup would become the premiere international sporting event culminating in the most coveted sports award in the world.

Since 1966, each FIFA WC tournament has had its own mascot, typically reflective in some way of the given year’s host country; and more recently, each WC has also had its own specially designed official match balls for each year. The first mascot was World Cup Willie, a lion representative of that year’s hosts, England, wearing a Union Flag Jersey which read «World Cup.» In 1970, the mascot was Juanito, a young boy clad in a kit and sombrero, as Mexico was the host of that year’s Cup. Since then, other mascots have included Naranjito (an orange) for Spain in 1982; Pique (a jalapeno pepper) for Mexico when they hosted again in 1986; Ciao (an Italian tri-color stick figure for Italy in 1990; Striker, the WC Pup for the United States in 1994; Footix (a rooster) for France in 1998, and Zakumi (a leopard) for South Africa in 2010.

Why Football Fans Need Their Own Social Network

In recent years social media has evolved from a communication tool between people to a dominant driving force on the World Wide Web. Nowadays social media has a huge impact not only on the digital realm, but also on business, politics, trends and almost all aspects of our world.

A common assumption is that social networks are totally driven by people, but that is partly incorrect, in reality social networks are driven by dominant forces and media giants. In reality people are not shaping social media, but social media is shaped for them and they just follow, which is a sad reality by itself because social networks were supposed to be driven by the people not the other way around.

How this is related to football. Football is the most popular sport on earth, more than 3.4 Billion people watched world cup 2010, almost half of the planet! And it was estimated that about 1 billion people watched world Cup 2014 final between Germany and Argentina. Traditionally football has always been covered by TV, newspapers and news websites. But in recent years social networks started taking an important portion of this coverage. With the shift from traditional news to social media news, and from computer devices to mobile devices, people are now more comfortable in consuming football news in their favorite social network, and at the comfort of their mobile devices. You can get all football news from all sources at your news feeds depending on the pages that you follow, compare this with search engines or bookmarking several websites, the first option became the more popular method of following sports events.

Although football has good presence in top social networks but for football enthusiasts that presence is missing or not enough, for instance you still do not get updated with all football events, and as a football fan you will need to do exhausting search to follow all the pages you are interested in. Other problem is that football news are buried inside swarm of posts from all other subjects, where you can not easily filter out posts that are not related to football.

Football fans deserve their own social network where they can talk exclusively about football and share related news and stories. They need social channels that are dedicated for football fans, where they can meet, interact and share football passion. They need a place where they can follow the latest news and matches results without the need to leave to search for the information.

In a new world governed by social media, people are becoming addicted to the ease of access to information that social media provides. And because people are obsessed with ease of access to what they are interested in, the future of social media will be shifting towards niche social networks that are specialized in specific interests and affinities.

The Great World Cup Germany 2006

The 2006 FIFA World Cup (officially titled 2006 FIFA World Cup Germany, sometimes referred to as the Football World Cup) finals are scheduled to take place in Germany between 9 June and 9 July 2006. Qualification for the tournament is now complete, with all 32 competing teams confirmed. The 2006 finals are the 18th to be contested.

A total of 12 German cities have been selected to host the World Cup final tournament. The stadium capacities shown are all seated capacities. Many of the stadiums have higher capacities for German domestic football matches as some of the seats are replaced with terraces.Starting from Germany 2006, the winner of the past World Cup had to qualify for the Finals. Only the host nation qualifies automatically from 2006 on.

In the qualification process for the 2006 FIFA World Cup, the six FIFA confederations were allocated a share of the 32 spots available on the basis of the strength of their teams. The final distribution was as follows:Europe – represented by UEFA : 51 teams competing for 13 places (Germany qualified automatically as host nation for a total of 14 places) ;Africa – 51 teams;South America -10 teams;Asia – 39 teams;North, Central American and Caribbean -34 teams;Oceania – 12 teams.

For the first time ever, the defending champion (Brazil) does not qualify automatically. The hosts (Germany) will retain their automatic spot. In 1934, the defending champions (Uruguay) declined to participate and the hosts (Italy) had to qualify, but in the tournaments between 1938 and 2002 (inclusive), the hosts and the defending champions had automatic berths.

The original distribution of places between the six confederations called for Oceania to be given one full spot in the final 32; however, this idea was seen as giving Australia a virtually certain place in the finals, being by far the strongest footballing nation in their region. This decision was reconsidered in June 2003 and the previous distribution of places between Oceania and South America was restored.

The main surprises in European qualification at World Cup Germany were the absences of 2002 third-place finishers Turkey (eliminated by Switzerland after a momentous playoff), 2004 European Champions Greece (eliminated by the Ukraine), and established sides Denmark (eliminated by the Ukraine as well), Russia (eliminated by Portugal), and Belgium (eliminated by Serbia-Montenegro and Spain). In Africa, 2002 quarter-finalists Senegal (eliminated by Togo) and established sides South Africa, Cameroon, and Nigeria (eliminated, respectively, by Ghana, C?te d’Ivoire, and Angola) unexpectedly missed the trip to the Finals. The other zones saw no major upsets.While representing Oceania, from the beginning of 2006 Australia is part of the Asian Confederation, and will represent Asia in following World Cups.

If teams are even on points at the end of group play, the tied teams will be ranked as follows:greater number of points obtained in matches between the tied teams,goal difference in matches between the tied teams,greater number of goals scored in matches between the tied teams,goal difference in all group matches,greater number of goals scored in all group matches,a play-off on neutral ground, with extra time and penalties if necessary (in qualifying),drawing of lots (at the final event).This is a change from the 2002 FIFA World Cup, where total goal differential was the first tiebreaker.

Thirty-two years after the last football World Cup in Germany, the 2006 FIFA World Cup will again take place in Germany. For the first time after the reunification of both German states, the entire world will look to the New Germany, situated at the heart of Europe.

Ole Gunnar Solskjaer – On the Sunny Side of the Street

Never in Manchester United history was so much owed by so many to so few as when substitutes Ole Gunnar Solskjaer and Teddy Sheringham in tandem together wrote soccer poetry with their feet in the Champions League final versus Bayern Munich in 1999. Indeed, the match against the German club was to become the pinnacle of Solskjaer’s long and illustrious footballing career.

Born in the small town of Kristiansund on February 26th 1973, Ole Gunnar Solskjaer began his playing career with local club Clausenengen. Even though the Manchester United faithful hardly raised an eyebrow when he arrived in Manchester in 1996, it did not take long for the supporters to realise the club had unearthed a real find. A no-nonsense performer with a powerful work ethic, his drive and determination inspired his Old Trafford team-mates and put fear into opponents. Scoring several crucial goals for Manchester United during the 1996/97 campaign, Solskjaer finished as the club’s top scorer with 18 League goals in his very first season at The Theatre of Dreams.

Although the Norwegian striker had his soccer career cut short by injuries in 2007, he stayed with the Old Trafford club and eventually took over the reigns of the Manchester United Reserves the following year. As for the international stage, Ole Gunnar Solskjaer made his first appearance for Norway in a friendly against Jamaica in Kingston on 26 November 1995, and went on to collect a total of 67 senior caps for his native country. In honour of the loyal Manchester United stalwart, a fully deserved testimonial game was staged against Espanyol in front of an incredible 68,000 crowd at Old Trafford in August 2008.

After finding the back of the net on his Manchester United debut at home to Blackburn Rovers in August 1996, the Norway international proceeded to make a total of 366 outings for the Manchester Reds, scoring 126 goals. Indisputably, the highlight of Solskjaer’s footballing life came in the 1999 UEFA Champions League Final when he netted the winning goal against Bayern Munich in the last minute of the match, winning the coveted Treble for Manchester United.

In retrospect, the prodigious Norseman was no doubt one of the most significant footballing servants ever to pull on the famous red shirt in Manchester United history. Sir Alex Ferguson has without doubt had some notable success in the transfer market in the past, and the £1.5 million he paid Norwegian outfit Molde to sign Solskjaer seems like a complete bargain by today’s prices.

«We had to score some goals after the pressure we had. It’s unbelievable and it’s very difficult to describe how I feel just now. But if people still wonder why I stay at Manchester United they can see why. The team spirit, it is unbelievable.» – Ole Gunnar Solskjaer quote.

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