3 Unusual Things That Can Make A Difference With Your Soccer Cleats

There are plenty of options when it comes to soccer cleats thanks to the many brands developing new designs and series every once in a while. Your football boots may do little in improving your skills on the pitch, but they do play a huge role in how you perform while out there and how easy it is for you to use your football playing skills. For this reason, you definitely need to get yourself a pair of boots that works for your style of play to be able to achieve your objectives during play.

When buying soccer cleats, players check out the usual elements like sizing, brand, materials and cost of the cleat. However, by digging more into details that are not that commonly checked out, you increase your chances of finding soccer cleats that offer so much more than just a pair of boots to protect your feet during play. Here are some of the unusual things you should consider checking out when buying your next football boots to get a pair you will simply love using.

1. Stud configuration

Boot companies are going beyond the usual when it comes to stud configuration and traction. Some have embraced innovative configurations that provide new traction type like the extreme positioning of rear tripod studs so that early ground contact and stability is achieved with the high velocity release. In some cases the misaligned studs come with forefoot studs to allow excellent traction as well as explosive acceleration. You can also find two blade heel design which caters to acceleration and allows the studs to penetrate and at the same time release off the surface even when you are at your fastest speed possible. Check out what the stud configurations means to your performance and get yourself a cleat that will make a difference for you during play.

2. Missing tongue

It may sound weird because everyone is used to boots and shoes that have tongues. However, the missing tongue is not a mistake, but actually an intentional removal that eliminates flapping that most players may have experienced before. A number of brands are embracing the no tongue boot design to reduce weight of the boot and to also manage creating a better looking boots overall. With the tongue missing, the companies have created comfortable fits around the ankles so you still enjoy comfort even with the tongue removed.

3. Foam insert

90 minutes of play can seem like years when you have little cushioning for your feet. With all the running and kicking, you definitely deserve an insert that eases your feet in the most comfortable of ways throughout the game. A thick insole that offers a responsive and spongy feel would be the best for this. Football boot brands use different materials, but boots that feature 4D foam inserts seem to be quite impressive in terms of comfort and balance. Check out the type of foam insert that comes with your pair of cleats and make a good choice for the sake of your feet.

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5 Star Luxury Hotels in Scotland

If you’ve got the cash to splurge, or if you just fancy dreaming, Scotland has a number of top luxury hotels to match its spectacular scenery. Here are ten of the best. Some of these are famous names you may well have heard of, other perhaps not so. All of them however are amongst the most opulent accommodation you’ll find in Scotland.

The Marcliffe Hotel & Spa

Situated on the outskirts of Aberdeen amongst 11 acres of woodland grounds, this privately owned hotel is a lovely blend of the traditional and contemporary. The spa boasts aromatherapy, massages, and body treatments, whilst hunting, shooting and fishing are available on the local estates via the hotel’s agents. There is a strong focus on local and regional cuisine in the Marcliffe’s Conservatory Restaurant, with lunch often being served outdoors in summer. This is a hotel strongly focused on comfort and relaxation.

Kinloch House

This is a truly authentic Scottish country house hotel, elegant with an old world romance. Kinloch House is located a few miles outside the town of Blairgowrie in rural Perthshire amongst 25 acres of grounds. Family owned and run, it’s a popular wedding and big business meeting venue. The rooms echo it’s days in the Victorian era as a luxury sporting lodge, with intricate period details and lavish furnishings. Its restaurant is thought to be amongst the best in Perthshire, with top quality locally-sourced ingredients always on the menu.

Turnberry Resort

A famous name in Scottish accommodation which, like a couple of other hotels on this list, has a strong golfing association, having hosted four Open Championships on the course which it overlooks. Turnberry, located in rural Ayrshire, has received numerous accolades, including the Scottish Hotel of the Year award and the Golf Tourism Scotland award. It has a strong Edwardian feel, with the rooms boasting spectacular views across the golf course and the Firth of Clyde. There’s also a luxury spa with 20 metre swimming pool, fitness studio, sauna and steam room.

2121 Restaurant with Rooms

Something a little different – 2121, located in Edinburgh, is a Michelin Star restaurant which also sports four lavishly appointed rooms, each with a different theme and with fine views across Scotland’s capital city. As well as said Michelin Star it’s received a plethora of accolades for its cuisine and accommodation from the likes of the AA, the National Restaurant Awards, the Scottish Tourist Board, and the Scottish Style Awards.

Old Course Hotel

Another golfing Mecca in Scotland (indeed it’s the home of the game) is St Andrews, and just like Turnberry here you’ll find a another grand hotel perched by another famous golf course. The Old Course Hotel offers a 3 AA rosette restaurant alongside several other acclaimed (but less formal) bars and restaurants. There are 144 beautifully appointed rooms, including 35 suites, featuring amongst other lavish touches, silk lined walls, whilst a number possess private balconies. The hotel’s opulent spa features a 20 metre swimming pool with cascading waterfall, hydrotherapy pool, rooftop hot tub, steam room and sauna.

The Witchery by the Castle

At the top of the Royal Mile in Edinburgh’s Old Town, hidden amongst a muddle of historic buildings, you’ll find this little gem. Established in 1979 in the basement of a then derelict building, such is the reputation The Witchery has built over the years that it’s been said it’s ‘almost a famous as the castle itself’. Its reputation is built on an excellent restaurant, boasting the best of Scottish cuisine, which has proven a real hit with local residents, not to mention a plethora of celebrities. Its eight captivating suites have been described as ‘one the seven wonders of the hotel world’, each totally unique, filled with antiques and historic fixtures and fittings. This is a place to stay like no other.

Loch Ness Lodge

Recently the recipient of a prestigious UK & Ireland small hotel award, this exclusive, intimate venue is located on the banks of Loch Ness a couple of miles from the village of Drumnadrochit, and is particularly geared towards romantic escapes, weddings, and small house parties. Rooms are individually named and styled, taking inspiration from the lodge’s natural surroundings. There is excellent fine dining on offer, with the hotel always striving to source local, organic and ethically prepared produce, whilst also boasting its own kitchen garden. There is easy access to many local activities, including kayaking, fishing, shooting and pony trekking, and you certainly won’t find anywhere more sumptuous to stay for a spot of Nessie hunting!

Gleneagles Hotel

A most famous name in Scottish hotels, this world-renowned Spa & Golf Resort is located on an 850 acre Perthshire estate. It’s 232 rooms are all opulently appointed, with a choice of the traditional or the modern, whilst there’s also 26 suites available, the top one of which, the Royal Lochnagar Suite, is the absolute last word in luxury. The hotel’s spa is an incredible experience, designed to be the most tranquil space possible. Additionally there are two swimming pools, gym, saunas and Turkish bath. Outdoor activities provided include shooting, fishing, equestrian, 4 x 4 driving and of course, golf – Gleneagles has three championship courses and is set to host the Ryder Cup in 2014.

Inverlochy Castle

If you ever wanted to stay in a castle in Scotland, here’s how to do it in style! Located just outside the town of Fort William, Inverlochy is an incredible luxury hotel and restaurant located in the most spectacular of settings, among the glens and mountains of the West Highlands. In its former life as a 19th century private residence Queen Victoria once spent a week here, and as a hotel it very much retains that massively grand Victorian flavour. There are 17 individually styled and named rooms, all very spacious and sumptuously appointed, with facilities including laptop with internet access, and a personal safe. The restaurant is internationally recognised and boasts a Michelin Star. Sporting and Country Pursuits can be enjoyed on the local 75,000 acre Achnacarry Estate, as well as golf on Fort William’s 18 hole course, mountain biking, and winter sports at the nearby Nevis Range.

Glenapp Castle

Of course if you prefer your hotel castles in the south of Scotland, the Ayrshire village of Ballantrae to be precise, this one might fit the bill. Glenapp Castle, like Inverlochy above, is a an incredibly luxurious, opulent and sumptuously appointed Scottish hotel. To give you some idea, even the smallest of its 17 individually named, themed and styled rooms is big (198 sq. feet) and features an original fireplace with real flames. It boast one Michelin Star and four AA Rosettes for its fine dining restaurant, with an emphasis on the highest quality local Ayrshire produce. 36 acres of gardens are available for the exclusive use of guests, who can also can also enjoy access to a nearby normally private members spa.

What Coffee Capsules Are Compatible With Nespresso

Not all Nespresso machines work with any coffee capsule.

Water in the capsule container instead of Coffee in the Cup: The new Nespresso Machine models create incompatibility with Capsule Clones. In the test performed by K-Tipp, a large European Consumer Magazine, in January 2014, especially capsules from Coop, Jacobs and Aldi did not work, whereas Pressogno, Café Royal and La Caffè Mocha achieved 100% compatibility.

Nespresso has changed the way capsules are pierced, causing some compatible capsules to no longer function properly. The needles in the latest Nespresso models are so thin, that they are not able to pierce the capsule of some competitors and in the extreme case, will crush the capsule.

The Nespresso machine models «Pixie», «U» and «Inissia» are using the new, thinner injectors. This is «part of our ongoing development» of the capsule system says Nestle.

The problem for customers: While the new, thinner needles work well with the original Nespresso Aluminum capsule, they struggle with some plastic capsules from other manufacturers, as the needles are too thin and can’t pierce through the hard plastic.

The result: crushed capsules, half-full cups and plenty of water in the body, or the machine simply refused their service and turned off.

Our advice: Anyone who has previously used coffee capsules from other manufacturers should keep their Nespresso machine as long as possible, as the new machines do not work with all capsule clones.

K-Tipp performed a test with 12 Nespresso coffee machines and 8 Coffee Capsule brands

The most important outcome:

Capsules from these brands fit into all machines and are 100% compatible with the machines tested:

  • the Pressogno capsules «Espresso Medium» (SPAR and Volg),
  • the «Espresso» capsules Café Royal ( Migros) and
  • the capsules «Espresso» La Caffè Mocha (Coop, Fust and InterDiscount ).

These capsules did not work

By far the most problems occurred with the following brands:

  • the capsules «Espresso Classico» Jacobs Momente and
  • the capsules «Espresso 1882» Caffè Vergnano.

None of these capsules worked in the Nespresso «U» of Koenig. The needle could not pierce the capsules from Jacobs and the machine shut down.

Water ran passed the Caffè Vergnano capsule straight into the cup.

Jacobs manufacturer Mondelez says: «We are working to regain compatibility as soon as possible. There was a similar statement from Coop, stating that the suppliers would adapt to the changes.

The capsule «Supremo» from 100 % Espresso (available at Aldi) also proved incompatible: The Aluminum foil came off the capsule in almost all the testing. Particularly annoying was that in some cases, the foil was caught in the machine and had to be scraped off with a knife. Aldi is aware of the problem and says that in the problem with the foil has been resolved.

How the test was performed:

K-Tipp bought 12 standard editions of current Nespresso machines from De’Longhi, Koenig and Turmix. 10 Capsules from 8 different manufacturers were tested in every single machine.

  • Did the mechanism work properly?
  • Did the needles pierce the capsule or crush it?
  • Did we get a cup of coffee or some watery broth?
  • Not every deformation of some plastic capsule necessarily led to a loss in quality. However if there was more water in the cup than expected, this was considered a malfunction

The History of World Cup Football

The FIFA World Cup (often called the Football World Cup or simply the World Cup) is the most important competition in international football (soccer), and the world’s most representative team sport event. Organised by Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA), the sport’s governing body, the World Cup is contested by the men’s national football teams of FIFA member nations. The championship has been awarded every four years since the first tournament in 1930 (except in 1942 and 1946 due to World War II), however it is more of an ongoing event as the qualifying rounds of the competition take place over the three years preceding the final rounds.The final tournament phase (often called the «Finals») involves 32 national teams competing over a four-week period in a previously nominated host nation, with these games making it the most widely-viewed sporting event in the world.[1] In the 17 tournaments held, only seven nations have ever won the World Cup Finals. Brazil are the current holders, as well as the most successful World Cup team, having won the tournament five times, while Germany and Italy follow with three titles each. The next football World Cup Finals will be held in Germany.

The first international football match was played in 1872 between England and Scotland, although at this stage the sport was rarely played outside Great Britain. As football began to increase in popularity, it was held as a demonstration sport (with no medals awarded) at the 1900, 1904 and 1906 Summer Olympics before football became an official competition at the 1908 Summer Olympics. Organised by England’s Football Association, the event was for amateur players only and was regarded suspiciously as a show rather than a competition. The England national amateur football team won the event in both 1908 and 1912.

With the Olympic event continuing to be contested only between amateur teams, Sir Thomas Lipton organised the Sir Thomas Lipton Trophy tournament in Turin in 1909. The competition is often described as The First World Cup,and featured the most prestigious professional club sides from Italy, Germany and Switzerland. The first tournament was won by West Auckland, an amateur side from north-east England that was invited after the Football Association refused to be associated with the competition. West Auckland returned in 1911 to successfully defend their title, and were given the trophy to keep forever, as per the rules of the competition.

In 1914, FIFA agreed to recognise the Olympic tournament as a «world football championship for amateurs», and took responsibility for organising the event. This led the way for the world’s first intercontinental football competition, at the 1924 Summer Olympics. Uruguay won the tournament,before winning the gold medal again in 1928, with another South American team, Argentina, taking silver. In 1928 FIFA made the decision to stage their own international tournament. With Uruguay now two-time official football world champions and due to celebrate their centenary of independence in 1930, FIFA named Uruguay as the host country.

The 1932 Summer Olympics, held in Los Angeles, did not plan to include football as part of the programme due to the low popularity of football in the United States. FIFA and the IOC also disagreed over the status of amateur players, and so football was dropped from the Games.FIFA president Jules Rimet thus set about organising the inaugural World Cup tournament to be held in Uruguay in 1930. The national associations of selected nations were invited to send a team, but the choice of Uruguay as a venue for the competition meant a long and costly trip across the Atlantic Ocean for European sides. Indeed, no European country pledged to send a team until two months before the start of the competition.Rimet eventually persuaded teams from Belgium, France, Romania, and Yugoslavia to make the trip. In total 13 nations took part — seven from South America, four from Europe and two from North America.

A spin-off tournament, the FIFA Women’s World Cup, was first held in 1991. It is similar to the men’s tournament in format, but so far has not generated the same level of interest.