Fraternal Twin Parenting Concerns

Identity and Your Fraternal Twin

For the most part, throughout this article I refer to a fraternal twin in the singular rather than the plural «twins.» This is to emphasize the individuality of each twin. Too often twins are defined only by their being a part of a whole, rather than by their own individual identity. This can be very damaging emotionally, especially during the time children are struggling to establish their own self worth and place in the world.

Treat your fraternal twin as the autonomous, unique child they are. Genetically, fraternal twins are no more similar than their siblings who were born one at a time, and they certainly have personalities all their own. DNA tests can be performed to determine which type of twins your children are – fraternal, identical, etc. Far too often people look too hard for similarities between fraternal twins that simply aren’t there – and in the meanwhile, they miss the opportunity to get to know each twin individually.

As a parent, do everything in your power to encourage each twin as they develop their own identities. If one wants to play soccer and the other has a passion for bagpipes, encourage each of them to work hard and excel at what they want to do. You will be doing the twins and the world a gross disservice by pigeon-holing both children into the same activity just because they happened to be born at the same time.

At the same time you are encouraging and accepting the difference between your fraternal twin and her brother, accentuate the similarities. There is no doubt your twins will share a special bond, if for no other reason than that they are growing up with a sibling their same age. The bond that fraternal twins share can be the source of love and support throughout their lives, and you would hate to destroy that by being overeager to make them lead different lives.Dressing Your Twins Alike

When they are little, it probably matters very little what you dress your twins in. But when your fraternal twin starts to become conscious of the fact that she is different than most people, you will need to be especially sensitive to her needs with regards to establishing her individual identity. Simply put, if your children like being dressed the same, do it; if they don’t, do them and yourself the favor of letting them wear different clothes.

In the end, as is the case with all children, there is no clear cut answer when it comes to the best way to raise your twins. Learn everything you can from those who have been there and done that, but trust your parental intuition and do what’s best for your kids. Finally, remember that «the most important work you will ever do will be within the walls of your own home.»

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Considerations to Be Kept in Mind While Buying Soccer Cleats

All sorts of players, whether they are experienced ones, the young ones, the adult ones or the pro everyone needs a hand while picking up the perfect cleats for playing soccer. This article is dedicated towards making the right choice and selecting the cleats which are perfect for your feet. Let us start.

Cleats are Cleats!

This point becomes the first guide to buying cleats to illustrate that it is only the technique of the player which matters. The cleats can only accentuate the game. And hence no player should think that purchasing high quality ones would mean a drastic change in the game as it is going to be the endless practice which will make all the difference.

Get to know your style

Whether you are a goalkeeper, or a forward, defender, midfielder or winger, all this is going to impact on the type that you are going to buy. This is because all these styles are different and require a different set of grip on the ground. After identifying the style, go on for choosing the one which fits you best.

What is the type of your pitch?

The sort of playground you will be playing upon also makes a lot of difference in choosing your soccer cleats. If the land on which you are going to play is muddy and wet then you should go for HG ones. If you need one for a year, then turf should be your choice. Go for firm ground (FG) in case of grassy ground. Soft ground (SG) is apt for surfaces which are soft enough to allow the studs to penetrate the ground. If the surface is solid as a rock, then Indoor ones should be your choice.

The material used matters!

There are a number of materials which are used in making them. It can be K-Leather, Natural leather, synthetic leather, synthetic, mesh or knit. The K leather quality allows your feet to get molded properly and it also provides durability. Made up of the skin of a calf or goat, these are very good at the balls. Some companies are working in the direction of using synthetic leather that gives the same effect as that of natural leather. Mesh is a trendy and lightweight upper covering which sometimes allows moisture to reach the skin of the player. Companies are working on the waterproofing technology of mesh.

Weight

The weight also matters a lot. On an average cleats with the weight of 8oz is considered to be perfect as it keeps the things balanced and the player does not feel the heaviness. However, there are some extra light weight which also weigh between 5oz to 6oz.

Budget your cleat

The most important aspect of purchasing is the budget. How much can you spend on it? Usually $150 or above is the elite level where you can purchase the top companies cleats. But to see a minimum of budget, it should be $10 at least which you are willing to spend on.

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The Amazing And Often Strange Coffee News Highlights Of 2014

2014 was an exciting year for our beloved coffee, some good, some bad, some strange. As we approach the end of the year we’ve taken a look at some of the more notable stories of 2014.

December: A Time For Giving… But Probably Not Cocaine.

December, time for giving and the warm feeling when we see others open their presents. These acts of generosity were put to the test in Berlin when a local coffee roaster opened up their latest shipment of coffee from Brazil, to find it contained 33 kilos of cocaine! We’re unsure whether they had a hearty Christmas smile on their face, but we’re presuming confusion and fear was a more likely response. They reported the «shipment» to the police and Santa.

November: Peak Coffee Prices

Coffee prices reached their peak in 2.5 years during November. The dry weather in Brazil that has affected much of their yearly crop played a significant role in the increase. Much of the speculation now is how this year’s drought will affect the crop in 2015. Although there have been rains over recent months, the question still remains as to how this will impact the flowering of new plants over 2015.

Many are predicting that if the weather returns to a semblance of normality, then the crop should be roughly the same as 2014. If weather continues to become more extreme then production would fall below the levels of 2014.

October: Cup North

A little closer to home we saw the inaugural «Cup North», a coffee party for all coffee lovers in the north of England. Put together by the local coffee community it was a chance for the spotlight to shine on the culinary and coffee developments outside of London.

While the focus was on coffee, the 2-day event also promoted beer, chocolates and some of the exciting «foodie» developments in and around Manchester. Let’s hope it continues for 2015.

September: Coffee & Biofuels

There are many known alternative uses for leftover coffee ranging from an effective compost, to being used an odour remover for whiffy socks. One of the most exciting developments of 2014 was the new company Bio-Bean.

Set-up in January by Arthur Kay, the company takes the used coffee grounds from London coffee shops and turns the waste into an advanced bio-fuel. In September they received a €500,000 grant from the Dutch Lottery.

Although widely suspected as a bribe with which to increase their scores from the UK during EuroVision (OK I made that bit up), the money will help the environmentally green Bio-Bean expand their operations and build a plant large enough to handle the processing of the collected coffee grounds. One gold star for Bio-Bean. A great idea and good luck for 2015.

August: Coffee Theme Park Given To Green Light

If you’ve ever dreamed of visiting a theme park with a giant caffeinated mouse, then August may have been the month for you. Funding was granted to develop a 64 acre coffee theme park in the Gangwon Province in South Korea.

The area has seen lot of development ever since the announcement that the 2018 winter Olympics were going to be held in the area. Designed as an environmentally friendly family theme park, the location will also house a production, roasting and distribution facility. Presumably the latter won’t be of interest to the kids. A distribution roller coaster with embossed livery on the side doesn’t really appeal to children.

The project will however create over a thousand jobs for the local community and feature a resort and coffee museum.

July: Fresh vs. Instant

In July the Euromonitor International Study published their latest research highlighting the continuing growth of instant coffee in countries that historically were associated with tea drinkers, namely China, Turkey and India. Almost half the world prefers instant coffee to freshly ground coffee.

In the UK, although the coffee market maturing and we’re seeing a greater understanding of fresh and gourmet coffee products, the instant coffee market continued the gain strength especially when being consumed at home. Quite surprisingly in the UK us Brits are responsible for over a third of all instant coffee sold in Western Europe.

While it’s still often viewed as unacceptable to offer instant coffee in many social or business situations, when at home these malleable rules seem to go out of the window. Convenience in many situations wins over quality.

Part of the growth was attributed to the marketing of instant coffee, many of the words traditionally reserved for fresh coffee were finding their way onto packets, jars and bags in the supermarket. One product describes itself as the world first «whole bean instant»… we still have no idea what that means!

June: World Championships

June saw the winner of the 2014 World Barista Championships. The title eventually went to Hidenori Izaki of Maruyama Coffee Company, Japan. The judges awarding him the prize after evaluating all contestants on a selection of criteria including their cleanliness, creativity, technical skills and presentation.

Hidenori was the 15th winner of the competition, produced and held by the World Coffee Event (WCE). The annual championship was held in Rimini, Italy and was the culmination of many local and regional finals throughout the world.

Congratulations to all participants especially Maxwell Colonna-Dashwood from the UK who eventually came in 5th, yes we are showing geographical bias.

Final Standings

Champion: Hidenori Izaki, Japan

2nd: Kapo Chiu, Hong Kong

3rd: Christos Loukakis, Greece

4th: Craig Simon, Australia

5th: Maxwell Colonna-Dashwood, United Kingdom

6th: William Hernandez, El Salvador

May: Coffee & Cows

It seems that used coffee grounds can be used for almost anything! Starbucks partnered with a Japanese manufacturer of contacts lenses in the hope of turning leftover coffee grounds into a viable and environmentally friendly livestock feed for the Tokyo dairy market.

The fermented grounds were removed from the stores at Starbucks and incorporated into the food for cattle. The process has been tried before but the results showed that the coffee acted as a diuretic among the cattle and the high salt content was a concern. Apparently the new process includes lactic acid fermentation that ensures the feed produced became a viable option. Again, we have no idea how this works, but it sounds very impressive.

April: UK Barista Championships

If you mentioned the World Championships during April most people (probably tea drinkers) would immediately think of the F1 Grand Prix in China, or the start of the Snooker World Championships with its whispering and dapper waistcoats. To the creative coffee folk of the UK, April could only mean one thing; the build up to the Barista World Championships had begun.

Maxwell Colonna-Dashwood who took home his second title ultimately won the regional UK Barista Championships, held during the London Coffee Festival. Congratulations to Maxwell. With the award firmly tucked under his arm he would travel to Italy to compete in the World Championships in June. Flying the flag for the UK… probably without a waistcoat.

Feb/March: The Football World Cup

Much of the speculation during February and March was around the football world cup and how the Brazilians passion for their national sport would affect the coffee industry.

With around a third of all coffee coming from Brazil, the concerns were that the games held in Rio De Janeiro would disrupt the production, delivery and overall infrastructure of the coffee industry. At the risk of sounding anti-climatic it all worked out OK, even if it didn’t for the Brazilian football team.

January: Myth Busted

We’ve probably all heard the old wives tale that coffee causes dehydration. We’re told that we should drink a glass of water for every cup of coffee we consume. Where this theory comes from we have no idea, but research released in January from the University of Bath concluded that this was actually a myth.

Rather than cause dehydration, moderate coffee consumption actually hydrates us in a similar way to water. Personally if I was stranded in the Sahara with the choice of either a cup of coffee or nothing, I’d certainly choose the former… but only if it had cream… and sprinkles.

How Often is the World Cup of Soccer Held?

The World Cup is soccer’s biggest stage – it is the championship of the most widely played sport in the all of the world. The talk, preparation and qualifying for each incarnation of the World Cup tournament seems to be going on all the time – but the final of soccer’s biggest tournament only take place during a one month period every four years.

Many fans, clubs and organizations argue that the World Cup tournament itself, as well as the sport of soccer would benefit greatly from increasing the frequency of soccer’s world championship tournament. Some present very valid points and cite that other major sporting events that hold tournaments on an international level are capable of organizing those tournaments once every year.

There is no doubt that the World Cup’s allure wouldn’t be hurt by holding the tournament every three or even every two years. It would probably increase soccer’s international popularity and would certainly do well to increase the tournaments revenue potential – holding the tournament every two years would, in effect, double the amount of revenue created by the biggest international sports tournament. Reducing the number of years between World Cup tournaments would most likely also allow the qualifying team’s players to be more recognizable to fans – the players would be in front of the fans and on a big stage potentially twice as many times during their careers. This could potentially make fans feel more connected and attached to the players on the World Cup teams and possibly even cause an increase in the amount of people who tune in to watch the World Cup finals.

Why Every Four Years?

World Cup purists argue that every four years is ideal for the tournament and it is relatively unlikely that any change in World Cup frequency will actually occur – at least within the near future. It does take quite a bit of preparation to get ready for a month long tournament which draws in teams from more than thirty countries and fans from probably more nations than that.

The host country is voted on and selected long before the tournament will actually be held and the lengths to which the organizers go to ensure that everything is not just prepared, but perfect for each World Cup tournament are truly exhaustive. Other major sports tournaments may host players and fans from all over the world but few, if any can match the sheer magnitude of the World Cup tournament.

More than 200 countries will vie for a spot in the final phase of the World Cup tournament in 2010 to be held in South Africa, and of those more than 200, only thirty one teams will make the cut to appear in the World Cup (the South African team receives an automatic bye to compete as the host nation, making the total team count an even thirty two.) Many believe that trying to cram all of the qualifying and all of the necessary preparation into a shorter time period would hurt the quality and the overall success of the tournament – and that could very well be true.

The only other sporting events that are truly comparable (even bigger than the World Cup), are the Summer and Winter Olympic Games, which are both also held once every four years due to all of the preparation of the destination and the athletes who are to be involved.

Holding the tournament only once every four years only adds to the majesty of the World Cup and contributes to the sheer desire and determination of the many teams involved to first make the cut to the finals and then compete for the prestigious title of World Cup Champion.