Football Stadiums of Istanbul

Turks are one of the nations that are fond of football. They try not to miss any match of their favorite teams, and are avid fans. It is by no means surprising, that in Istanbul there are many stadiums, and the majority of them correspond to the standards of the IOC. The most famous stadiums of Istanbul are Ataturk Olympic Stadium, Fenerbahce Sukru Saracoglu Stadium, Besiktas Inonu Stadium, and Ali Sami Yen Stadium.

Besiktas Inonu Stadium

The project of this stadium was elaborated by an Italian architect Paolo Vietti Violi. It was opened in Besiktas district in 1947, and had 16,000 seats. Then its name was the Mithat-pasha (the drafter of the first Turkish Constitution) stadium, and Ismet Inonu, the follower of Ataturk and the second presdient of the Turkish Republic participated at the opening ceremony. In 1973 the stadium got its new name in honor of Ismet Inonu, and till nowadays it is called Besiktas Inonu Stadium.

The place of the construction is very convenient: the stadium was built on the spot of the Dolmabahce palace stables, near the Bosporus. It is, probably, the only football stadium, where the two parts of the world – Europe and Asia – are seen from. In addition, magnificent views of the Dolmabahce palace and mosque, and the Bosporus open from the upper grandstands of the stadium. After being reconstructed in 2004 according to the standards of the UEFA, the stadium got the highest category Elite.

In the nearest future there will be another reconstruction, when the stadium will nearly completely be pulled down, and a new stadium, with 42,000 seats and transparent slip roof, will be built. Only one grandstand will be restored and preserved – Eski Acik – for it is considered the architectural monument. In addition, architects plan to build near the stadium a 5 star hotel, congress-center, shopping center, and parking area.

This stadium is the host field of the Besiktas football team, but other clubs as Galatasaray and Fenerbahce played here. However, it remains a place, where Black Eagles (an unofficial name of Besiktas players) defeated the teams of Barcelona, Liverpool, Milan, and Paris Saint Germain.

Ali Sami Yen Stadium

This stadium, which hosts Galatasaray football club, was opened in 1964. It was named after the founder of this team and their first president Ali Sami Yen, who later became the President of the National Olympic Committee of Turkey. Now the stadium has only 23,785 seats, and their matches of the European Tournaments Galatasaray holds in the Ataturk Olympic Stadium. However, Ali Sami Yen Stadium remains a place, where Galatasaray won Barcelona, Real, Manchester United, Fenerbahce, and Besiktas.

The unofficial name of Galatasaray players is Lions, and their fans name the stadium Cennehem (hell). Nowadays, Galatasaray meet their opponents with the motto Cennehem Hosgeldiniz, meaning Welcome To The Hell.

The Ali Sami Yen Stadium is in Sisli district, near the street, which leads to the Bosporus bridge. In 2007 Galatasaray started the construction of their new football stadium called Turk Telekom Arena. Besides the stadium with 58,000 seats, there will be built a covered sports hall with 15,000 seats, subway station, shopping center, and parking area.

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Leather Duffel Bag for Mother’s Day

Determining the type of lifestyle that your Mother has will give you a better idea of what style of leather duffel bag would best suit as a gift. Giving a beautiful but functional present will show Mom that you have really thought about her and care. There are many styles as well as sizes that fit any fashion as well as budget.

A leather gym bag is really a very functional bag. These bags have large top opening main compartments capable of holding sports equipment, such as a basketball, a soccer ball, or tennis balls as well as the necessary shoes, workout clothes, and towel. A deep or mesh exterior pocket is great for holding water bottles or sports drinks. With other pockets designed to hold cell phones, keys, membership cards, and toiletries. With a leather gym bag, any Mother will start her exercise routine with confidence.

A larger duffel bag for the traveling Mother should be within the airlines carry-on regulation size of 22 inches by 14 inches by 9 inches. This will allow her to have plenty of room for a couple changes of clothes and other items for a few days of business meetings. This carry-on duffel bag will also save time by allowing her to skip the check-in line and the baggage carousel. With the added security of not worrying about a lost bag at her destination. A classically designed bag will give the business Mom a sophisticated style.

Leather backpacks are great for the Mom on the go. Stylish and classy it can replace the diaper bag or purse. Most offer plenty of room with multiple zippered compartments and exterior pockets for easy access to frequently grabbed items. They can also feature comfortably padded should straps which allow a hands-free advantage. The biggest plus of all, for mothers everywhere, is that a leather backpack is easy to clean.

Business Mom would appreciate a leather laptop bag for organization and a modern look. This type of bag offers wide multiple pockets for laptop, files, and writing pads. Additional smaller pockets offer room for phone, passport, or other office supplies. Some bags also offer a shoulder strap for convenience as well as a cosmopolitan style.

A leather bag that offers functionality and easy care, as well as style would be a great choice for any type of Mother. Mother’s day is to show Mom that you care and by giving her a useful and luxurious leather bag, it will!

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5 Things to Look For in Good Soccer Trainers – Choosing the Right Soccer Trainer

When looking for soccer lessons for your kid, group or team, make sure you know what kind of soccer trainer you're looking for. Those of you that do not know too much about soccer may fall prey to 'trainers' that do not know much (or do not care much) about making an impact on your kids' game. The following questions will give you an idea of ​​what to look for in soccer coaches / trainers:

1- Does s / he wear cleats?

As trivial as this may seem, it is an important question. Especially when working in individual training or small groups, soccer trainers should be involved in the drills rather than watching from the sidelines.

2- Is s / he licensed?

Having a license is not an absolute requirement to be a good soccer trainer. In fact, a terrible trainer may have a license, but the opposite does not occur that often. Seasoned, serious trainers will more than likely have a license. At the same time, one should not evaluate trainers by the number of licenses they have. At the end, it's not about the rank but the difference they can make in your players' game.

3- Does s / he come to practice with prepared lessons?

Beware of trainers that show up to practice and "wing it". A good soccer trainer will come to practice with a detailed plan of topic (s) of the day and drills of the day. As a parent, you can ask for it at the beginning of practice and see if the trainer did his / her homework.

4- What is his / her attitude like?

Your player (s) will learn more from an engaging, positive trainer rather than a distant one that is just going through the motions. Soccer is a game. The trainer, as well as the players, should be having fun with it. If you can tell the soccer trainer dreads being there, maybe it's time to move on.

5- Referrals, referrals, referrals …

Do ask for referrals before agreeing to anything. Testimonials on a website are OK, but you want to be able to speak with real parents / coaches who have worked somewhat recently with the soccer trainer.

I sure hope this helped! Let me know if you have any questions.

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Sachin: A Billion Dreams

An entire set of generations grew up admiring Sachin and his style. When Sachin batted, the entire nation wanted to be glued to the television.

People relate to Sachin in more ways than one. He is a hero in multiple dimensions, a feat which athletes may not always achieve.

Sachin’s fan following does not span in India alone. All across the world, Sachin is seen as larger than life. He is the name which can give jitters to the opposition, even while they take time to admire the game.

While Sachin retired, he was a part of life for every cricket fan. One could not imagine a cricket game without him. Many of Sachin’s fans were born while Sachin was in the team. His career lasted for staggering 23 years. That’s a reasonably long time for playing at the top level, while being a top batsman.

Let’s run through some exciting facts about Sachin’s cricketing career.

  • It is hard to believe that Sachin Tendulkar made his career debut way back in 1989. It was also the year when Anil Kumble made his debut. The two went on to become the hottest players in the squad and win many games for India.
  • Sachin was just 16 years of age when he made his test debut. Only three players in the world have made a debut at a younger age.
  • Sachin took reasonably long to make his first ODI century. It took him 78 matches to get started. He got 110 vs Australia in the Singer World Series. This was in R.Premadasa stadium in Colombo, on 9th September, 1994.

However this was just the beginning, and set the wheels in motion for many more to come. Sachin’s career stats would take anyone by surprise. These are beyond comprehension and very hard for a batsman to achieve.

Sachin has gone on to score 49 centuries in the ODI format of the game. This includes a lightning fast double century, which is a rare feat to achieve.

Sachin has nearly 18.5K runs in the ODI format, and has played 463 matches to achieve the same.

Another interesting stat in Sachin’s career graph is that he has scored 96 half centuries. With his 51 test centuries, he is the only player in the world to have scored 100 centuries in ODI and test cricket combined.

In Sachin’s own words

Before you lay a foundation on the cricket field, there should be a solid foundation in your heart and you start building on that. After that as you start playing more and more matches, you learn how to score runs and how to take wickets.

The crowning glory for Sachin’s career was winning the World Cup for India. He was a part of the World Cup winning squad in 2011, and this is a dream come true for any player!

The Amazing And Often Strange Coffee News Highlights Of 2014

2014 was an exciting year for our beloved coffee, some good, some bad, some strange. As we approach the end of the year we’ve taken a look at some of the more notable stories of 2014.

December: A Time For Giving… But Probably Not Cocaine.

December, time for giving and the warm feeling when we see others open their presents. These acts of generosity were put to the test in Berlin when a local coffee roaster opened up their latest shipment of coffee from Brazil, to find it contained 33 kilos of cocaine! We’re unsure whether they had a hearty Christmas smile on their face, but we’re presuming confusion and fear was a more likely response. They reported the «shipment» to the police and Santa.

November: Peak Coffee Prices

Coffee prices reached their peak in 2.5 years during November. The dry weather in Brazil that has affected much of their yearly crop played a significant role in the increase. Much of the speculation now is how this year’s drought will affect the crop in 2015. Although there have been rains over recent months, the question still remains as to how this will impact the flowering of new plants over 2015.

Many are predicting that if the weather returns to a semblance of normality, then the crop should be roughly the same as 2014. If weather continues to become more extreme then production would fall below the levels of 2014.

October: Cup North

A little closer to home we saw the inaugural «Cup North», a coffee party for all coffee lovers in the north of England. Put together by the local coffee community it was a chance for the spotlight to shine on the culinary and coffee developments outside of London.

While the focus was on coffee, the 2-day event also promoted beer, chocolates and some of the exciting «foodie» developments in and around Manchester. Let’s hope it continues for 2015.

September: Coffee & Biofuels

There are many known alternative uses for leftover coffee ranging from an effective compost, to being used an odour remover for whiffy socks. One of the most exciting developments of 2014 was the new company Bio-Bean.

Set-up in January by Arthur Kay, the company takes the used coffee grounds from London coffee shops and turns the waste into an advanced bio-fuel. In September they received a €500,000 grant from the Dutch Lottery.

Although widely suspected as a bribe with which to increase their scores from the UK during EuroVision (OK I made that bit up), the money will help the environmentally green Bio-Bean expand their operations and build a plant large enough to handle the processing of the collected coffee grounds. One gold star for Bio-Bean. A great idea and good luck for 2015.

August: Coffee Theme Park Given To Green Light

If you’ve ever dreamed of visiting a theme park with a giant caffeinated mouse, then August may have been the month for you. Funding was granted to develop a 64 acre coffee theme park in the Gangwon Province in South Korea.

The area has seen lot of development ever since the announcement that the 2018 winter Olympics were going to be held in the area. Designed as an environmentally friendly family theme park, the location will also house a production, roasting and distribution facility. Presumably the latter won’t be of interest to the kids. A distribution roller coaster with embossed livery on the side doesn’t really appeal to children.

The project will however create over a thousand jobs for the local community and feature a resort and coffee museum.

July: Fresh vs. Instant

In July the Euromonitor International Study published their latest research highlighting the continuing growth of instant coffee in countries that historically were associated with tea drinkers, namely China, Turkey and India. Almost half the world prefers instant coffee to freshly ground coffee.

In the UK, although the coffee market maturing and we’re seeing a greater understanding of fresh and gourmet coffee products, the instant coffee market continued the gain strength especially when being consumed at home. Quite surprisingly in the UK us Brits are responsible for over a third of all instant coffee sold in Western Europe.

While it’s still often viewed as unacceptable to offer instant coffee in many social or business situations, when at home these malleable rules seem to go out of the window. Convenience in many situations wins over quality.

Part of the growth was attributed to the marketing of instant coffee, many of the words traditionally reserved for fresh coffee were finding their way onto packets, jars and bags in the supermarket. One product describes itself as the world first «whole bean instant»… we still have no idea what that means!

June: World Championships

June saw the winner of the 2014 World Barista Championships. The title eventually went to Hidenori Izaki of Maruyama Coffee Company, Japan. The judges awarding him the prize after evaluating all contestants on a selection of criteria including their cleanliness, creativity, technical skills and presentation.

Hidenori was the 15th winner of the competition, produced and held by the World Coffee Event (WCE). The annual championship was held in Rimini, Italy and was the culmination of many local and regional finals throughout the world.

Congratulations to all participants especially Maxwell Colonna-Dashwood from the UK who eventually came in 5th, yes we are showing geographical bias.

Final Standings

Champion: Hidenori Izaki, Japan

2nd: Kapo Chiu, Hong Kong

3rd: Christos Loukakis, Greece

4th: Craig Simon, Australia

5th: Maxwell Colonna-Dashwood, United Kingdom

6th: William Hernandez, El Salvador

May: Coffee & Cows

It seems that used coffee grounds can be used for almost anything! Starbucks partnered with a Japanese manufacturer of contacts lenses in the hope of turning leftover coffee grounds into a viable and environmentally friendly livestock feed for the Tokyo dairy market.

The fermented grounds were removed from the stores at Starbucks and incorporated into the food for cattle. The process has been tried before but the results showed that the coffee acted as a diuretic among the cattle and the high salt content was a concern. Apparently the new process includes lactic acid fermentation that ensures the feed produced became a viable option. Again, we have no idea how this works, but it sounds very impressive.

April: UK Barista Championships

If you mentioned the World Championships during April most people (probably tea drinkers) would immediately think of the F1 Grand Prix in China, or the start of the Snooker World Championships with its whispering and dapper waistcoats. To the creative coffee folk of the UK, April could only mean one thing; the build up to the Barista World Championships had begun.

Maxwell Colonna-Dashwood who took home his second title ultimately won the regional UK Barista Championships, held during the London Coffee Festival. Congratulations to Maxwell. With the award firmly tucked under his arm he would travel to Italy to compete in the World Championships in June. Flying the flag for the UK… probably without a waistcoat.

Feb/March: The Football World Cup

Much of the speculation during February and March was around the football world cup and how the Brazilians passion for their national sport would affect the coffee industry.

With around a third of all coffee coming from Brazil, the concerns were that the games held in Rio De Janeiro would disrupt the production, delivery and overall infrastructure of the coffee industry. At the risk of sounding anti-climatic it all worked out OK, even if it didn’t for the Brazilian football team.

January: Myth Busted

We’ve probably all heard the old wives tale that coffee causes dehydration. We’re told that we should drink a glass of water for every cup of coffee we consume. Where this theory comes from we have no idea, but research released in January from the University of Bath concluded that this was actually a myth.

Rather than cause dehydration, moderate coffee consumption actually hydrates us in a similar way to water. Personally if I was stranded in the Sahara with the choice of either a cup of coffee or nothing, I’d certainly choose the former… but only if it had cream… and sprinkles.

Rashidi Yekini – Scorer of Nigeria’s First Ever World Cup Goal

Gangling Rashidi Yekini is the most prolific striker to have come from Nigeria since the inception of the round leather game. He was nicknamed- Ye-king because of his knack for goals. He grew up in Kaduna metropolis where he became a household name in the state and subsequently gained national recognition.

In 1994, Rashidi Yekini led the Super Eagles to victory at the African Nations Cup held in Tunisia where he emerged as the competition highest goal scorer. He was a terror to opposing defenders and goalkeepers who found it hard to keep him at bay, due to his large frame and ferocious shots.

After the triumph of the Super Eagles at Tunisia 1994, the entire world were glad to welcome Africa’s most popular team to her maiden World Cup outing which was hosted by the United States of America. Nigeria first match was against Bulgaria in the famous Cotton Bowl Stadium in Dallas.

Before a capacity crowd of more than 40,000, the Super Eagles of Nigeria scored the opening goal in the 21st minutes of the tension soak encounter through enterprising Rashidi Yekini who was then plying his trade with Victoria Setubal of Portugal. It was a clinical goal that came off a wonderful move from the right flank where Ajax Amsterdam of Holland’s winger- Finidi George was operating.

The mesmerizing Finidi George got the better of the Bulgarian defence and sent in a tailor-made pass which found the on-rushing Rashidi Yekini in the 6 yard box of the Bulgarian. He made no mistake as he hit a first time shot into the back of the opposition net to register Nigeria first ever goal in the history of the FIFA World Cup.

The entire stadium erupted in joy and Rashidi Yekini almost tore the Bulgarian net with joy visibly written all over him. He had entered the history book in the most astonishing fashion. The match eventually ended 3-0 in favor of the Nigerians who out-played the Hristo Stoichkov led side. It was an encounter that witnessed the best of African football on display.

After his retirement from professional football, Rashidi Yekini made a shock return to the Nigerian Premier League, where he starred for Julius Berger of Lagos in the 2005-2006 season. He scored a couple of goals for the Bridge boys and eventually announced his final retirement from the game that had brought him fame and fortune.

He scored a total of 37 goals during his illustrious career with the Super Eagles and gained global prominence in 1993 when he was awarded the CAF African footballer of the year award.

World Cup Spread Betting – Get Your Football Clubs in Order

Tough new guidelines from UEFA will make clubs operate within their means from the start of the 2012/13 season. The move is set to bring more discipline to club finances and also take the pressure off player’s wages and transfers fees. Clubs will have to compete within their revenue. UEFA believes it will encourage investment in infrastructure, sport facilities and youth academies. It also believes it will help the clubs to sustain themselves in the long term and settle their liabilities in the good time.

The break even clause is a new departure for UEFA whereby the clubs will be monitored for 3 years. They will not be allowed to spend more than they earn from revenue give or take 5 million. They will be able to spend what they like on their stadiums, training facilities, youth academy and their communities.

The huge investments of billionaire owners will be severely cut though. Over the 3 seasons they will only be able to put in 45 million euro over the break even point to help pay wages and transfer fees. This means that if the clubs owners want to go and buy their way into the Champions League they can’t. Sounds good in principle to stop the big clubs splashing the cash but it also stops the smaller clubs like Fulham who have a mega rich owner. They won’t be able to spend anymore of Al Fayeds money above the 45 million euro, the same amount as Mr Abramovich down the road at Chelsea. So suddenly it’s not so fair anymore as Fulham wouldn’t have the same revenue stream as Chelsea or the ways of increasing it either.

At the moment most of the Premier league clubs are alright. But Aston Villa, Chelsea, Man City and Liverpool would all set alarm bells ringing at UEFA with the huge losses they are incurring. It seems the huge debts some of the big clubs are holding won’t be taken into account at the moment. The system will only be used as monitoring tool for the moment and clubs won’t be banned from UEFA competitions. They would first be warned and put under review before been banned.

Another part of the clause states that clubs will not be able to owe money to rivals, players, staff or tax authorities at the end of the season. They’re hoping to avoid what happened at Portsmouth who went into administration owing millions in transfer fees, tax and VAT to name a few. I think I read somewhere yesterday that they had offered to pay their creditors 20% of what they owed them. A recent report on European clubs said that 50% of them where making a loss and that 20% where in serious financial danger.

In other World Cup Spread Betting football news. Michael Essien has failed to recover from injury and has been omitted from Ghana’s squad. Javier Hernandez will become a Man Utd player on 1st July after receiving a work permit and World Cup hosts South Africa beat Colombia 2-1 in a friendly at the Soccer City stadium.

And finally, while South Africa were beating Colombia, the Colombians were having their hotel rooms inspected by two of the employees who relieved them of their money. They were later arrested. Hope security is ramped up just a little bit during the next few weeks. Bonjour.

Creating and Maintaining Environments for Young People in Football

Over the last four weeks (and having been coaching for 18 years) I have noticed some very worrying environments. It’s worrying to me as a coach, parent and independent observer having witnessed the top level academies, middle ground and grass roots and being constantly told «its getting better.»

I have seen some good examples of well-meaning people who manage safety whilst giving ownership to young people. Not easy to do. The other thing that isn’t easy to do is manage adrenaline and feelings. We all want our own children to do well. That’s a given. Whether its homework, model making, swimming or football. From the mentioned however which do people change their methods in? Which would an adult change their mindset in?

The game is passionate – Fact. People visit stadiums, watch adults, moan at refereeing decisions and complain all week if our supported teams lose. To the point of becoming almost Piers Morgan like. There is a distinct difference however. The people you shout, cheer and bemoan are indeed adults. They can cope in pressurised adult environments. The very best can even block them out and perform. It takes years of practice. Playing in the champions league for millions of pounds is one thing, playing in front of 30 people in a 5v5 astro turf court is simply another.

The two environments are not linked. They are not replicas. Children will with their imagination, mentally attempt to visit and dream of such stadium. This is all the pressure they need.

We are missing a huge trick. The street and playground we used to commentate on whilst playing and pretend to be gazza or maradona was our pressure. The next defender is pressure. The last gasp save is pressure.

Unfortunately the following is additional pressure to young people:

· Making kids play in set positions – most that have played will tell you – you don’t end up playing in the same one for very long.

· Shouting things such as «don’t mess about with it in your box, get rid, clear it, pass it, down the line» and so on. The things said from my last 4 weeks up to 25 times in one hour by one adult to 1-5 children. Confusion and pressure.

· Spectators shouting «tackle him, pass-pass-pass, well-in.» it’s been done for years I know I played but it does no good.

· A parent shouting «tackle» Is also a motivation for increased aggression. Was the child going to tackle anyway? Probably.

· The good players can’t play – they face managers of young teams going man for man, even 2 players marking them but not child led, just so the adult can win.

· I have witnessed excessive fouling by young players who instead of shake hands and pick kids up are laughing as the «tackle» has become over emphasised. Just wait until the tackling sort plays at a good level (if they manage it with no technique or skill – probably not), the tackle will become a chase as the players will dance around them and or play through them.

Do you want your child to be playing and enjoying and be good and win at 15, 16 and beyond? I’m sure the answer is yes. Then you need to stop now and think. The u7-9 age groups is the key to the following to develop them into good 16 year olds:

· Freedom to try things – 1v1 moves without fear of losing the ball, playing from the goalkeeper and dribbling anywhere on the pitch.

· Remember the 5v5 pitch is only a quarter of a full size pitch. What they do in front of their own goal they will do in the whole quarter when older. If they just clear the ball now they won’t know any different.

· Scores should not be recorded. Any leagues asking for scores for u7-14 games in my opinion are failing kids. It makes adults record them and it makes them cut development corners. It doesn’t make any sense.

· Trophies and man of the match awards – I have rarely seen an award given for a good series of turns, skills, and technical aspects. I hear lots of «brave, worked hard and even its… ‘s turn this week. what is the point? Again an adult idea for some strange reason not the idea of the child (beginner not tainted).

· Not commenting on kids showing off and forcing them to pass – many skills not just taking players on are lost – agility, acceleration and deceleration, movement, awareness, touch and use of both feet, use of different parts of the foot etc. by not allowing dribbling and own decisions you’re stopping the whole round athletic development of children.

The best game environments I have seen are as follows:

· Kids arrive, hand shakes with coaches.

· Changing room – random selection, age group pairing, no birth bias, let kids choose their teams, get ready together if possible for social reasons

· Little talking from coaches – apart from «have fun, be an exciting player, can you think of how to improve as you play.»

· No formational organisation – let this happen. Kids will drift into positions but know they can move anywhere on the pitch. I often hear «you be the defenders and don’t go over the half way line.» You may as well say don’t play.

· Never say things such as «do a job or work hard» it isn’t a chore it’s a fun game

· Questions are asked in intervals only – what if? How could you? If that happens what should we do? Scenario planning.

· Say nothing to them whilst playing the game. They will communicate if allowed anyway. They’ll communicate like other 7 year old kids do. In a way they understand. Saying things during play is one of the worst things any coach or parent can do adding pressure, stifling creativity and decision making and ends up panicking about results.

· Referee needed? Or just a facilitator that manages safety? The latter is fine. If we encourage honesty and fair play and set nice guidelines it works.

· Certain rules – allow dribble ins, futsal pass ins – why do we encourage throw ins with young children? Mix it up.

· Parent comments – are they encouraging? If I’m a goalkeeper and I stop a certain goal scoring opportunity then I have just saved it. I’m happy in myself as it was me. I already know or even pre-empted it. Why do I then need a chorus of «great save» as it probably wasn’t a great save but my own and my teams’ achievement. Debateable?

If you have 4 outfield players, rather than stating «let’s play 2 defenders, 1 midfielder and 1 striker,» ask the kids. They will come up with some wonderful concoctions and they might then go and play that way or go and follow the ball. The ball, you must remember is the real reason we play the game from a young age. This changes somewhat over time when we spend hardly any time with it at all working on tactics as we get older and play a higher level. There is absolutely nothing wrong with kids wanting the ball. There is nothing wrong with encouraging dribbling. They will lose the ball. That’s when the next player has a turn. Too many are ramming passing and getting rid of the ball down kids throats. Let’s get their techniques spot on and then worry about winning later.

I have watched 4 weeks of games of late and haven’t yet seen any child that’s played in goal come off their line yet. Why aren’t children being taught the whole game? Again the instruction from the adults isn’t that of intelligence but more aggression and the Dunkirk spirit.

At such frustration one grand dad told his grand son just to boot it up the pitch «it might as well be up there so they don’t score.»

I have also seen a rise of the wannabe match reporter. They too talk of scores, winning and so on. Gladly the team my son has begun playing for doesn’t promote this. The kids don’t know the score. They carry on playing after the game. They have the social and psychological corners catered for. They are answering questions and behaving in a nice manner. They are playing. An opposition coach stated his team had won ‘again’ 11-7 (I think). He told his player as they didn’t know of course. Then proceeded to hand out the M.O.M award to claps from parents. My sons team thankfully carried on playing with each other into one goal still smiling. Not one asked «why don’t we get a medal?» This particular game, whatever the score was full of «pass, pass, down the line,» but a goal was scored from a dribble with the player not listening. Good job he didn’t really. «we won» said the coach; the other team had shared equal playing time and taken off the two better players not concerned of the score. They changed the goalkeeper 3 times. The kids had fun. This information wasn’t taken into account by the ‘coach,’ as so many only live off the end result not the process. They don’t see the potential 16 year old.

I write this with a huge passion for developing young players. I have seen some excellent kids thrive in the last 10 years and unfortunately seen some with great potential be ruined by coaches. Coaches that aren’t really putting themselves in the kids boots.

Compare the smile to the serious pressurised face and I know which id rather see.

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A Short Biography of Famous Soccer Players – Djibril Cisse

His full name is Djibril Aruun Cissé. He was born on 12 August 1981 in Arles, France. His playing position in the field is Striker.

At the age of 11 He began his career at Nîmes Olympique in 1993. Afterward Cissé went to Auxerre still in the youth team. Gérard Houllier brought him to Liverpool. For the period of his time at Anfield Cissé played 49 matches with 11 goals; although he was at times played on the wing of right side.

He experienced playing football with some senior clubs: Auxerre (1993-1996), Liverpool (2004-2006), Marseille (2006-2008), Sunderland (loan) (2008-2009), Panathinaikos (2009 – till now).

Djibril Cissé is a French soccer player of Ivorian ancestry. Cissé is renowned mainly for his acceleration and pace, in addition to his hairstyles that always attention-grabbing. He has held the title of Lord of the Manor of Frodsham from the time when 2005.

At the age of 15 Cissé signed for Auxerre club, and in May 2002 made his international first appearance in opposition to Belgium. In May 2003, along with Auxerre, he triumphed for the French Cup and a month afterward the Confederations Cup with France. In the French Ligue 1 in the 2001-2002 and 2003-2004 season, Cissé was the top scorer making 70 goals in 128 league matches for Auxerre club.

Here are the lists of his honors he achieved as long as his career as a soccer player. The honors with the club are Auxerre (Coupe de France: 2002-2003); Liverpool (UEFA Champions League, 2004-2005), (UEFA Super Cup: 2005), (FA Cup: 2005-2006); Panathinaikos (Greek Super League: 2009-2010). And for the country is FIFA Confederations Cup: 2003.

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Chijioke Ejiogu: Complete Profile of Arugo Monkey

Goalkeeper Chijioke Ejiogu is the number one goal tender for Double CAF Champions league winners- Enyimba Football club of Aba. He is one of the most consistent goalkeepers in the Nigeria Premier league. His dexterity between the goalpost while playing for amateur side- Arugo FC in the late 1990's during the FA Cup Competition has earned him the nickname- Arugo Monkey.

Monkeys are one of the most acrobatic animals in the jungle, and they have the ability to jump from one tree to the other with so much ease and skill. These were the exact qualities that Chijioke Ejiogu showed during the FA Cup competition more than 15 years ago while starring for Arugo FC

He was quickly snapped up by Julius Berger FC of Lagos immediately after his FA Cup heroics, and helped the Bridge Boys to the final of the CAF Confederation Cup. His agility behind the post was soon noticed by the management of Enyimba FC and he soon put pen to paper for the peoples Elephant in the 2008-2009 season.

The confidence he displays in organizing his defense line is quite amazing, considering the fact that football has become so competitive and tactical. One of the qualities that distinguishing a good goalkeeper from a bad one is the ability to anticipate and deal with aerial balls and this is one of the strong points of Chijioke Ejiogu.

He has been invited to the national senior team on several occasions during the reign of Coach Christian Chukwu as Chief Coach of the Super Eagles, but on each occasion, luck has not been on his side. The desire to excel in the local league to enhance future call-ups has always been his main motivation, and this has seen him emerging as one of the stars in the star-studded Enyimba Football club.

Arugo Monkey has become a veteran of sort in the Nigeria Premier league and with each passing season, he has shown more maturity and better composition between the posts to the admiration of his fans all over the country. His acrobatic saves and daring maneuvers in front of strikers have earned him a place among the best local league players.

It is held that the coming years will witness a change in the fortune of this charismatic goalkeeper who has paid his dues in the Nigeria Premier league in the past 10 years. His chances of putting on the green white green colors of the Super Eagles have been made a lot easier with the appointment of an indigenous Coach for National senior team in the person of Coach Samson Siasia in December 2010.

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