Win Your Bet With a Soccer Guru

These days it is not a difficult task at all to win a bet if you are getting guidance from a soccer guru. This is because of the fact that a soccer betting guru will always give you genuine and profitable soccer betting advice that will lead your bet towards success. All over the world soccer is played with immense zeal and zest and people are crazy about it that is the reason why soccer is the most played game all across the globe and is providing chances to gain monetary benefits for people associated with the sport in any form no matter if they are players, organizers or bookies.

One can find hundreds and thousands of bookies all across the globe, but few are there who also teach or guide a person how to book. Previously it was difficult for individuals to get guidance in this regards, but today there are a lot of opportunities for everyone to learn how to book in a profitable way by winning a bet. Genuine soccer tips and betting tips are the necessary tools that are required for a successful betting. Soccer has most of his fans in Europe, Asia and Americas and that is the reason why one can find many online books in Indonesia, Vietnam, Thailand, Malaysia, Singapore, United States, United Kingdom, Russia, Poland, Greece, Ukraine, Romania and Canada that claim to give solid betting advice to their customers for placing a successful soccer bet.

For placing a successful betting, two people are very important, one is the betting guru and the other is the soccer guru. A soccer guru is the person who is good at analyzing the game of soccer along with the changing trends and performances of the teams and players. This man is capable of guiding people by giving concrete betting advice while suggesting on which player or team an individual should make his betting. Apart from a soccer expert a betting experts is also the key man that give an expert advice and expert opinion to a client for winning a bet. A betting expert gives advices regarding the changing conditions and parameters of the teams, players and circumstances while a game is being played. A min to min advice is also very important as far successful betting is concerned. A betting professional is the most important person in the betting field as he is having the detailed knowledge and the inside information regarding the teams and the players. This is the reason that this person can give the most authentic, accurate and educated betting advice.

Today many online platforms are available giving quality advice along with many valuable value added services live giving live score updating and soccer information.

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Soccer Fitness – The Common Characteristic in the 2010 FIFA World Cup Final Four Teams

The world cup quarter final games of late have been very exciting and dramatic to the least. Soccer fitness has certainly been very noticeable from my perspective as a major reason the four remaining teams are in the semifinal games. It will also be an important part of the finals.

The ability to perform repeated sprints with minimal recovery was key in Germany's victory over Argentina. This was very evident as the game progressed in to the second half. Any time Germany attacked and lost the ball they were quick to return and defend. Unfortunately Argentina appeared to fade as the game went on. They lost the ability to attack and defend with the same intensity.

This quality for soccer fitness is invaluable. A soccer player that is able to sprint and recover quickly regardless of the position he or she plays makes a difference towards the end of the game.

The soccer fitness level of the Netherlands grew as the game against Brazil carried on. It was as though the Brazilian players were being worn down as the Netherlands were relentless on their attack. Sprint and recover, sprint and recover and sprint and recover appeared to be the motive of the Netherland attackers up front. Unfortunately for Brazil they were unable to slow the game down or turn up a notch or two as many would have expected.

In the two other quarter final games it appeared to me that Spain, Paraguay, Uruguay and Ghana were fairly level with their fitness levels.

This makes it quite obvious that soccer is a game of power and speed and should be trained that way regardless of the age or gender of the soccer player. There are several ways to get into this type of condition:

1) Soccer players may perform interval training by changing the intensity, movement and recovery for soccer fitness drills. An example would be forward sprints for 10 seconds with twenty seconds recovery for a certain number of repetitions.
2) Repeated sprints of distance of 10M-40M
3) In season 3v3, 2v3, 4v4 or 3v4 at high intensities for time or goals then a short active recovery in the form of light individual dribbling then repeat again.

By doing these three things the ability to attack and defend with out being tired improvements soccer fitness over the season and creates the stamina necessary to last an etern soccer game

Football Betting – End-of-Season Games

Everyone loves a trier, especially when it comes to putting down your readies. There’s nothing more galling for punters than to realise that your selection was ‘not off’ and that you’ve not even had a fair run for your money.

Blanket television coverage and the greater transparency of the betting exchanges have raised awareness of the ‘non-trier’ issue in horse racing, but football punters need to be on their guard too. It’s clear that all is not well in the world of football, judging by the recent match-fixing scandal in Germany involving referee Robert Hoyzer, ongoing investigations into some Italian results and irregular betting patterns on obscure European and international matches.

Thankfully, the consistency of results in the bigger leagues (and especially in England) indicates that there is no reason for lack of punter confidence. The main problem – as in horse racing – lies around the margins, in those matches (or races) not subject to the full glare of the media spotlight and where skulduggery is less likely to arouse suspicion.

All very trying

However, my research suggests the ‘non-trier’ issue does rear its ugly head towards the end of the season, even in the major leagues. Most leagues are competitive enough to ensure they go right to the wire in the battles for championships, places in Europe and safety from relegation.

But, inevitably, some teams have nothing left to play for in the final weeks of the season, which is where problems can arise.

The last few weekends of a league season feature three types of match:

1. Matches between two teams with nothing to play for.

2. Matches between two teams with something to play for.

3. Matches between one team with something to play for and one team with nothing to play for.

Out of focus

The commitment of either team cannot be taken for granted in the first category, so the most sensible betting strategy towards the end of the season is to focus on categories two and three.

Matches in the second category should be assessed using your usual techniques. (Anybody who doesn’t know needs to read our football betting articles on inside-edge-mag.co.uk – Ed), but the best betting opportunities often lie in category three, where there’s always the potential for a ‘non-trier’.

This isn’t to suggest that anything underhand takes place in these games, merely that a slight drop in focus by one team can make all the difference in a competitive league such as the English Premiership.

There may be many reasons for this drop in focus – including the widely held view that some players are ‘on their holidays’ before the end of the season. It’s equally likely that, given the demands of modern football, a player who has been carrying an injury will be rested once his team has nothing left to play for, or that there may be some easing off in training sessions. Whatever the reasons, our results at the bottom of this article show a team with something to play for is more likely to win a match against a team with nothing to play for.

Across the top three English divisions and the major European leagues that we analysed (Spanish Liga, German Bundesliga and French Ligue 1), these matches usually produce a win rate of 50-60% for the team with something to play for, and a win rate of 20-30% for the team with nothing to play for. The stats vary a bit from year to year and league to league, but overall are pretty consistent.

It’s a bone of some contention that such figures offer conclusive proof of the non-trier effect, but there’s one crucial piece of supporting evidence that swings the issue for me. If there was no link between the results and one team’s urgent need for points in such matches, we’d expect a higher win rate among higher-placed teams than those struggling near the bottom, since that’s what has been happening during the rest of the season. In fact, the win rate of teams battling to avoid relegation is abnormally high in such matches at the end of the season – virtually on a par with the win rate achieved by teams at the top of the table who are chasing titles, places in Europe or play-off slots.

Fight for survival

For example, the last five seasons of the English Premiership have produced a win rate of 55% for teams with something to play for. That figure does not vary, no matter whether the team is in the top six or the bottom six.

It’s a similar story in other leagues, though the win rate of relegation-threatened teams in such matches does tend to be slightly lower overall than that achieved by teams near the top of the table.

So, do these stats alone offer a good betting opportunity? The simple answer is no, but there are some refining touches that can put these figures to good advantage.

Let’s look at the overall picture first. A 55% win rate would give a tidy profit margin if the average odds available were evens, but that’s unlikely to be the case in matches where one team has something to play for and the other team doesn’t.

Taking the games that fell into this category last season in our featured leagues, a level-stakes bet on all the teams with something to play for would have brought a small loss. This was due, in part, to last season’s lower-than-average win rate by these teams, but a more significant factor is the reduced odds that punters are asked to accept on such teams.

How to beat the odds

The bookmakers generally factor in the ‘nothing to play for’ syndrome when pricing up end-of-season matches, though a few do slip through the net. If you’re good at making your own book on matches, you can spot these matches – otherwise, you will find it difficult to make a profit backing blind on the teams with something to play for.

The counter argument, of course, is that the value lies in backing against these sides, given that teams with nothing to play for will be available at artificially inflated odds in such matches. This doesn’t hold water, though, due to the lower win rate of these teams. The problem for punters, as outlined earlier, is to know whether these teams will be trying hard enough – the evidence suggests that, on the whole, they won’t be.

How, then, can we beat the odds? Well, a little more delving into the statistics puts more flesh on the general assumptions often made about end-of-season matches.

Starting at the top, the late-season records of league champions are very revealing. There’s clear evidence that, once a title has been secured arithmetically, there’s a widespread tendency for champions to take their foot off the gas. Last season, for instance, the Spanish and German champions were confirmed with two games to play – Valencia and Werder Bremen, the respective winners, then promptly lost their last two games.

This is far from an isolated example. In 2001, Manchester United lost their last three games, having run away with the title, though it has to be said that they had finished with four straight wins when in the same position the previous season.

Overall, however, the record of already-crowned champions suggests they’re prone to easing up once the race is won. In the leagues analysed here, the win rate of champions over the course of the season usually exceeds 60%.

Once the title has been secured, however, this dropped to an average of 57% over the past five seasons. And the fall is even more dramatic in games where they face a team with something to play for – their win rate then averages just 45%.

A ton of profit

In general, then, it’s worth opposing already-crowned champions. Last season, in the leagues featured here, this approach would have yielded a 24% profit to level stakes. If you had concentrated only on games where the opposing team still had something to play for, the strike rate in opposing the champions would have been 100% and the profit a whopping 125% to level stakes.

The only caveat is to be wary of any factor that may cause the champions to keep the pressure on – one example is Arsenal last season, when they were Premiership champions with four games to go but were keen to maintain their unbeaten record. They did so, but with only a 50% win rate in their last four games (two wins, two draws).

Another factor might be when a lower-division side is chasing a landmark such as 100 points – that was the case with Wigan Athletic in the old Division Two in 2003, when they reached three figures with two wins and a draw, even though they were already champions.

Knowing that champions ease off once they’ve nothing to play for, it’s easy to assume already-relegated sides must be even more prone to this. Again, the reality is more complicated.

Bottoming out

Overall, in the leagues analysed here, relegated teams have a 23% win rate once they’re mathematically doomed – pretty close to the average expected from relegation-zone teams over the course of the season. In other words, they don’t fall apart once all hope is gone.

In fact, relegated teams actually have a surprisingly good home record in the final weeks of the season. On average, they manage a fairly even split of wins, draws and losses at home and in none of the leagues does their number of home defeats outweigh the combined number of wins and draws – making relegated teams always worth a look on the Asian handicap at home, as they’ll rarely, if ever, be giving up a start to their opponents.

Where they perform very badly is away from home. Even more markedly, they’re usually lambs to the slaughter (home or away) versus teams still with something to play for. Their loss rate in such matches is 70% and, in the past five seasons, no relegated team recorded a single win in this type of fixture in the top leagues in France, England and Germany.

That 70% loss rate is equivalent to the odds on their opponents being around the 2/5 or 4/9 mark. The bookies are stingy about such teams, though you could still have made a profit last season backing against the relegated teams in such matches. With extra selectivity about the odds you’re prepared to take (no less than 1/2, say), the potential exists to make money on these games.

Middle-of-the-table teams is an area to tread warily. While the stats show punters generally can rely on sides scrapping for top places or battling against relegation, this isn’t the case with teams marooned in mid-table for the last few games of the season, with no incentive to move up and no fear of dropping down a few places.

The final word

In the leagues analysed here, the win rate of mid-table teams in their final games doesn’t appear too bad, averaging 33%, which is broadly in line with their overall seasonal record.

The picture isn’t so rosy, however, when the figures are narrowed down to games against teams with something still to play for. The win rate of safe mid-table teams dips to 26% and their loss rate goes up to 49% (from 41% overall).

In the end, end-of-season betting all comes down to the odds available. Pricing up these games is a difficult process, and it’s impossible to come up with hard-and-fast rules about when to bet or what odds to accept. An appreciation of the underlying stats is important, however, because end-of-season games aren’t governed by the normal rules of form and are a law unto themselves in many instances. The one golden rule is: be sure you know your selection will be trying.

More Football Betting Articles

Submitted By Q

Dennis Publishing

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Pep Guardiola’s Love Affair With Barca Continues

Whichever way you look at it, Pep Guardiola’s first season in charge at Barcelona has been a phenomenal success.

On Wednesday, he became the youngest manager to ever lead a team to Champions League success, and in doing so, he rounded off the Spanish treble: the La Liga title, the Copa del Rey and the Champions League in one season. Not bad for a 38-year-old manager who is currently managing his first ever professional side.

Josep or ‘Pep’ was born in Barcelona in 1971. His footballing talent was became evident from an early age and he spent six years coming through the ranks at Barcelona’s youth academy, planter Barcelonista. He made his senior debut in La Liga in 1990, aged just 21. Under Johan Cruyff, Guardiola – playing as a commanding defensive midfielder – soon went on to become an integral part of their squad.

In total, he spent eleven successful years in Barca’s first team, and was a key player in leading the club to their first ever European Cup triumph in 1992. He was made Barcelona captain in 1997 by then manager, Louis van Gaal.

In 2001, he left Spain for Italy and joined Serie A club, Brescia for a season, where he made 11 appearances, scoring two goals. The following season he moved to AS Roma for another season, where he only featured four times.

Unfortunately, his time in Italy was surrounded by controversy when he was forced to serve a four-month ban for testing positive for steroids. But thankfully just two years ago in 2007, his appeal against the charges was successful, and he was cleared.

Guardiola retired from professional football in May 2006, but spent little time away from the game – and Barcelona. He was appointed manager of Barca’s ‘B’ team a year later in the summer of 2007.

And before the end of his first season in charge of Barca’s second string, it was announced that he would succeed Frank Rijkaard as Barcelona manager at the start of this season.

What Guardiola has achieved in his first season in charge at Barca is nothing short of remarkable. The style of play he has implemented this season has been largely focused on possession and passing and movement. And when his side click into gear, it is beautiful to watch.

The way in which his team so outclassed Manchester United in the Champions League final on Wednesday proved to be a thrilling climax to an already memorable debut season. The question now is: how can he possibly do better next season? Simple, really. Do it all again.

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