Top 3 Reasons Why Homework Should Be Banned

The debate over whether homework is still a viable learning tool or has become outdated has actually been going on for many years. The trend in this debate seems to be heading in the direction of «outdated» but there certainly is no consensus yet. The factors I see as most significant in this issue are societal, centered on the family, and are primarily based on TIME; and as such, are unlikely to be reversed.

Top 3 Reasons Why Homework Should Be Banned:

1. Family time gets first priority.

Family life has changed considerably over the past few decades. With today’s high divorce rate, many parents spend a great deal of time just shuffling children back and forth. Each parent values the time with their child and the child values the time spent with each parent.

The financial realities of life now dictate that both adults in the home need to have jobs, but those jobs do not always coincide. Many of the jobs in today’s society are not the old standard 9-5 kind of jobs. When parents get home, they very often bring their own version of homework.

Many families are having to deal with military deployments to various parts of the world, and all indications are that we will be deploying soldiers as «peacekeepers» for many years to come. A parent on deployment may be gone for up to a year at a time. Some families have had to deal with multiple deployments. In a few cases both parents have been deployed at the same time.

For each of these situations and many others, family time becomes too precious to spend on school homework.

2. Children are too busy.

In years past, children came home from school, changed clothes, went outside to play with the neighbor kids until dark, did their homework–sometimes with parental help, and then went to bed early. Not so anymore!

Today, a large percentage of children are involved in some kind of sport after school. It may be Little League, or league soccer, swimming at the «Y,» football, volleyball, etc., but kids are involved in sports. Many also take music lessons, or dance, or gymnastics, or even language lessons. Some children are involved in scouting. Some are active with church activities. The list of potential involvements is quite long; but the point is that by the time children get home, THEY ARE TIRED!

School homework is the very last thing they want to do.

3. Teens are even busier.

Many teenagers are involved in the same kinds of activities as their younger siblings, but they may also be involved in school activities like band, drama, debate club, etc. Some teens play school sports as well as league sports. And on top of everything, some teens have jobs. Many of the teens who don’t do school activities, work a job after school every day.

When are these students supposed to do school homework?

Certainly, it can be argued that a student’s «job» should be learning first; and, I hate to admit that I said those words once or twice in my teaching career. However, we all must realize that life changes and we must adapt to those changes. To continue to require homework of students whose families endorse their activities is simply not fair. The schools cannot be in a position of punishing the child (for failing to do homework) when the family considers other things more important.

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Simple Ways Of Quick Drying Wet Soccer Boots

Wet soccer cleats can be challenging to play in and they can also be pretty uncomfortable for your feet. It is also very important to remember that moisture can be damaging to shoes and you therefore need to ensure that your cleats dry properly after every wash or after wet play. But what do you do when you have very little time to allow the shoes to dry properly?

1. Let the laces loose. Loosening laces opens up your cleats getting more air in them, hence hastening the drying process. When you let the cleats dry with the laces on, you also expose the seams to tension because they contract as they dry. Loosening the laces is therefore also helpful in eliminating this kind of stress.

2. Remove the shoe insole. Most cleats come with removable insoles. Such insoles are convenient because they give players the chance to change into more comfortable and supportive ones as the situation demands. They also come in handy when looking for a quick way of drying the cleats. Removing the insole does not only help the shoe interiors to dry faster, but the insole will also dry faster by itself. You can wrap it up with paper towels or hang it upright using clothe pins or pegs to hasten the process.

3. Wipe off grass, dirt and mud. If the cleats are wet from a rainy game or wet grounds, you should make a point of wiping off the grass, dirt and mud off the shoes using a damp towel. It could add to the wetness, but the drying process will be simpler without these elements. This is also a simple way of ensuring that you have an easier time the next time you wash the boots; dried mud can be harder to remove when washing.

4. Use dry cloth to pat your cleats. It helps in removing most of the surface moisture this kick starting the drying process. You can do this both on the outside and the inside of your boots to reduce dry time.

5. Fill the boots with balled newspaper. The newspaper ball will help in absorbing a good percent of the moisture. You can let it sit for a considerable length of time before removing and replacing with a dry ball before later allowing the boots to air dry. This action can also be helpful in keeping the cleats from shrinking when drying, but you should ensure that the newspaper does not leave them too bulgy either. You can also slide a newspaper piece on the laces and the tongue to enjoy similar drying results.

6. Place cleats in breezy areas. The truth is that even cleats will dry much faster under moving air. The breeze wicks off the moisture speeding the drying process. It is however important that you ensure the area is not humid or damp; drier air is much better in hastening the drying process. Avoid using heat as it can permanently damage your shoes.

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Get The Right Soccer Cleat Size For An Enjoyable Performance

Soccer cleats just like regular shoes are sized to help players find snug fitting shoes that will make kicking the ball ad running as comfortable as possible. Considering that soccer cleats need to be tighter in terms of fit, you really cannot rely on your regular shoe size when buying your cleats. Soccer shoes are made from thin materials and a tight fit ensures optimal ball touch and feel.

Materials

When looking for the right snug fitting soccer boot, the material is among the things you should always consider. Cleats made from premium leather, especially kangaroo leather tends to start stretching after a few uses. High quality leather molds to feet shape and when new they need to fit snugly so that even after a few uses they do not stretch and feel too roomy for your feet. When buying synthetics, remember they do not stretch that much, hence you should buy comfortably fitting cleats compared to tight ones.

Width and length

These two elements are used to determine cleat size and using them you can be in a position to choose a pair you will love and enjoy wearing and playing in. For performance and comfort, your cleats should fit closely to end of foot, but not touch on toes; the gap should be anywhere between ¼ and ½ inch. Usually the upper part of the soccer shoe is designed narrow to keep the feet from sliding around inside as you play. For this reason, most cleats come in one width dimensions differing only in length. If you have wide feet, then you may want to check cleats designed with wide feet in mind.

Determining the right fit

When looking for the best, start by picking a pair that you actually like and from a brand you can trust with quality. Players who love their shoes tend to give better performances than those who don’t.

Next, you should figure out your size. If you have the luxury of trying them on before buying, try them on to ensure they are tight, but not so much that they hurt your feet. They should be close fitting otherwise you will have issues kicking ball properly.

When trying on the cleats, pay attention to pressure points; a snug fit does not in any way mean uncomfortable. In case you are a young player who is still growing, cleats that are a little large sized may be ideal. You can get proper socks to fill in the space as your feet grow.

Be sure to stand up and walk around a little in the cleats when testing the size. This is the only way you will be able to truly feel the toe position and how good they feel on your feet. Of course you may need a little time to break-in your cleats but even though the feel should be tight, it should feel right in every sense. You can try on as many different sizes as possible until you find the perfect one for your feet.

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3D Printing Success: What’s The Reason Behind It?

3D printing has made a strong stand in the printing industry and has given a tough competition to traditional manufacturing. It has successfully left its impact in every nook and corner of this world. Advancement in 3D printing has affected the production of prototypes, jewelry, architecture, portraits, aerospace and medical field. Food Science has also witnessed a major change with the coming up of 3D printing. You can now print out your favorite chocolates the way you want to eat it. That made you skip a beat, didn’t it? This is the magic of 3D printing and it has led to a major 3D printing success; renovating the wildest impossible ideas and presenting it to the real world in the most artistic way possible.

What has led to the 3D printing success?

This printing industry has been successful in gaining popularity and firming its position in this ever-advancing business. Quality of phenomenally managing time, helping its customers to get their products to develop fast, reducing the cost of the final product has led to consumer satisfaction on a bigger scale. It involves a technology of printing by interpreting the digitally supplied coordinates with the help of a 3D printer.

Now, you might think how does this make it better?

Well, describing the product is sometimes a very difficult thing to do because it leaves construction up to the imagination. A picture always acts up as a savior since it is worth a thousand words. There is no ambiguity when you hold the exact replica or at least a very close representation of your artifact. 3D printing industry allows self-designing of a product by its customers which contributes to the creativity of the industry. All this has led to the 3D printing success.

3D printing has witnessed a huge transition if we compare its present development to when it started back in 1986 by Chuck Hull. Though it is not possible to completely eradicate the traditional manufacturing, it is strongly believed that 3D printing would give a tough competition to it in future.

3D Printing Success Stories

1. Pictures are meant for everyone

‘Touchable memories’ by pirate3D, turns photographs into 3D-printed objects for people without vision. This was a social experiment to create an awareness of the unlimited possibilities of using technology to improve lives. The task was performed using an affordable home printer called Buccaneer. It led the visually impaired to re-experience images by feeling the artifact and fabricating a tangible scene of it.

2. Nike does it again

Nike launched the rebento duffel, the first 3D printed performance sports bag for Brazil’s 2014 FIFA World Cup. The carry-piece takes styling cues from the sports company’s fly knit pattern of the magista and mercurial. A laser-sintered nylon creates an intertwined weave seamlessly fitting into the 3D printed base without the use of glue or adhesive. The premium leather upper and strap construction also gives the body a lightweight, yet durable structure that allows for flex.

3. Don’t judge it on its size

LIX, A London based company has successfully created the World’s smallest 3D printing pen. The device enables users to create in the air. Sounds Impossible? But, as always 3D printing has made it possible. Made out of aluminum and measuring 164mm x 14mm, this device allows users to make objects in just a few seconds, including calligraphy, accessories, and one-off prototypes. It functions similar to a 3D printer the only difference is that it is a USB port charging pen which quickly melts and cools colored plastic enabling the pen to create rigid and freestanding structures.

4 Larger-Than-Life Facts About the Tennessee Titans

When do historical figures become immortal? Arguably, that happens when they creep into our day-to-day lives. For instance, consider the Titans. In Greek mythology, the Titans included the twelve children of the gods Ge (Earth), and Uranus (Heaven). The Titans were huge and powerful. Thus, the Titanic ship was named as such. Today we say that «Jane is a business Titan,» or that «Shakespeare was a titan of Renaissance literature.» Here are some interesting facts about some other titans, the Tennessee Titans:

1. The origins of the «Titans» are Greece and Memphis

The Tennessee Titans were formerly the Houston Oilers, where they played from 1960-1996. After relocating to Nashville, Tennessee in 1997, the team played two NFL seasons as the Tennessee Oilers. The team’s owner, Bud Adams, then decided to change the team’s nickname. It is common knowledge that the Titans were powerful gods from Greek mythology. However, did you know that people often refer to Nashville as the «Athens of the South»?

2. The Titans have earned playoff spots in nearly half of their seasons

Since moving to Tennessee, the Titans played 11 seasons from 1997-2007. Within that timeframe, the Titans have qualified for the playoffs during five seasons (1999, 2000, 2002, 2003, 2007), or nearly half of their tenure in Tennessee. Additionally, they have been division champions twice (2000, 2002), have played in two AFC championship games (1999, 2002), and have made one Super Bowl appearance (1999). Indeed, the Titans have been titans in the NFL.

3. Houston Oilers/Tennessee Titans players have earned NFL records

Throughout their history, various Houston Oilers and Tennessee Titans players have ended the regular season as leaders in multiple categories, including:

o Interceptions: Mike Reinfeldt: 12 (1979)

o Kickoff Returns: Bobby Jancik (1962: 30.3; 1963: 29.3)

o Passer Rating: Steve McNair: 100.4 (2003)

o Passing Touchdowns: Warren Moon: 33 (1990)

o Punting: Craig Hentrich: 47.2 (1998)

o Punt Returns: Pacman Jones: 12.9 (2006)

o Rushing: Earl Campbell (1978, 1979, 1980)

o Touchdowns: Earl Bambell: 19 (19 rushing) (1979)

4. Since 1997, the Titans have played in three stadiums

After moving to Tennessee from Texas, the Titans’ temporary home was Memphis’ Liberty Bowl. The Oilers played their first game in Tennessee in the Liberty Bowl, defeating the Oakland Raiders in overtime, by 24-21.

After one season in Memphis, the Titans’ big brass decided that the team should move to Nashville. Thus, they signed a one-year contract to play at Vanderbilt University’s stadium.

By the year 1999, the Oilers became the Titans, and had a new stadium to play in: Adelphia Coliseum. Interestingly, the stadium itself also underwent two name changes. It was The Coliseum from 2002-2005; and since 2006, has been LP Field.

Since moving from Texas to Tennessee, that Titans have created a fascinating franchise history. That began with their new nickname. After finishing in second place in the entire league, the team hopes to take the next giant step: an NFL championship. Cheer on the Tennessee Titans to victory, using quality NFL merchandise!

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Zinedine Zidane

Zinedine Zidane, the monk-like fantasista – heir to Platini’s throne as France’s greatest ever player, is also widely regarded as one of the greatest players in the history of the game. Maybe slightly overrated in some quarters when labelled with the ‘Greatest Ever’ tag, his achievements and trophy haul are certainly second to very few. For a time he was also the most expensive player in the world, costing Real Madrid a huge £46m. During his playing days Zidane became one of world football’s true superstars, and much loved players – his global fan base was (and still is) exceptional. From Europe, to North Africa (the origin of his roots) and the Middle East, to Japan – Zidane, was the man.

Zidane was born to Algerian immigrants who firstly moved to Paris, but eventually settled in La Castellane – a suburb with a huge North African community in France’s southern town of Marseille. It was here that Yazid Zidane was born in 1972. Yazid, his birth name, is what he was known by to his friends and family. The young Yazid looked to replicate his idol; Olympic Marseille’s very own fantasista, Uruguayan Enzo Franchescoli, by teaching himself tricks and repetitively juggling a football until he was better than most of the boys in the area. In a neighbourhood high in crime rate Zidane had to become tough, though this was mostly focused through Judo – something else he showed an early talent for. But it was football that won the youngsters heart. After school he would gather with the other boys from his tower block, in ‘Place Tartane’ – an 80 x 12 yard clearing in the middle of the housing complex, which served as a makeshift football pitch. By 13 years old his talent was such that he was spotted by a scout for Cannes who proclaimed: ‘I’ve found a boy who has hands where his feet should be’. After initial scepticism he was allowed to join the club’s ‘centre de formation’, leaving home and his family in the process to lodge with a club director’s family.

By 16 years old he was making his league debut versus Nantes. Then, playing the same opponents two years on, he scored his first senior league goal in a 2-1 win. Remembering the promise he made the young Zidane upon scoring his debut goal, the president rewarded him with a brand new Renault Clio. Unfortunately for the 20 year old Zizou, the Va Va Voom factor wore off pretty quick as Cannes were relegated the very next season. His skills didn’t go unnoticed however and with an offer coming in from Bordeaux, Zidane moved South for approximately £300k, where he would be reunited with his junior international team mate and close friend Christophe Dugarry. They formed part of an exciting new team that made waves in Europe as well as at home, winning the Intertoto Cup in 1995 and finishing runners-up in the UEFA Cup. It was during this period he also made his national team debut in 1994, coming off the bench whilst France were 2-0 down against the Czech Republic, and scoring twice. The press went wild – the new Platini had arrived. People outside of France were now beginning to take notice of Zidane’s attributes. The then Premiership Champions Blackburn Rovers coach Ray Harford expressed an interest in the midfielder, only for Blackburn’s owner Jack Walker to refuse, famously stating: ‘Why do you want to sign Zidane when we have Tim Sherwood?’

Zizou was a relative late bloomer on the world stage. He was already aged 24 when gaining his first major move – Juventus paying a modest £3.2m in 1996 to take him from the Bordeaux side that had starred (particularly against AC Milan) in the previous seasons UEFA Cup. Juve had chosen to snap him up before the summer’s Euro’96 competition in case of any value increase. But after his poor, lacklustre performances during the tournament, they probably saw their new commodity depreciate in value – leading Juventus president Gianni Agnelli to cuttingly remark: ‘is the real Zidane the one I’ve heard so much about, or the one I’ve been watching?’ To be fair to Zidane, he had just completed a mammoth 65-match season. Then on the eve of the Euros, he suffered a car crash. His arrival in Turin signalled more ‘new Platini’ comparisons. But after a difficult period of adjustment to the new league, murmurs of disappointment could be heard throughout the Juve faithful, leading Zidane to announce: ‘I’m Zinedine Zidane and it’s important that the fans understand that I can never be Platini, on or off the pitch.’ He was right. Zidane was a totally different character to the former Juventus number 10, and what’s more that shirt at Juve now belonged to Del Piero. Zidane’s squad number at La Vecchia Signora was 21 – an alien number to a fantasista, however after the frosty start in Turin his performances started to resemble a true fantasista. With winning goals against championship rivals Inter, and by helping Juve secure their second Intercontinental Cup in November versus River Plate, Zidane silenced his doubters. The win was made even sweeter for Zidane as he faced his teenage idol, Enzo Francescoli. The Uruguayan fantasista was ending his career back at the club where he had shot to fame. For Zidane, life couldn’t get any better.

Only it could.

That trophy was the first major of his senior career and sparked a remarkable winning period which would see him collect nearly every major trophy the sport had to offer during an incredible career. His stay at the Turin giants saw him win the Scudetto twice, a UEFA Supercup and another Intertoto Cup. During the same period with France he collected the 1998 World Cup and then followed it up with the European Championship in 2000. The only major trophy which evaded him was the Champions League. He had finished runner-up twice with Juve and now it seemed like his Holy Grail. It was probably a major factor in his decision to leave Juventus in the summer of 2001, when Real Madrid came calling and splashed out a whopping £47m for his services. The Real president Florentino Perez was embarking on his first galactico project, signing the best players in the world. And at this time, nobody was better than Zidane, having also picked up the greatest accolades any individual player could win – the Ballon d’Or in 1998, and World Player of the Year in that same year, whilst also collecting it in 2000. In 1996 when he arrived at Juventus he may have been labelled as an inferior model to the great Platini, but in 2001 he was leaving having certainly surpassed him.

In Spain, Zidane won the watching Bernabeau faithful over instantly. They adored his velvet touch and instant control. His mastery over the ball reminded their older followers of their glorious players from the past – not least their greatest ever player, Alfredo Di Stefano, who’s number 5 shirt Zidane now wore (the number 10 shirt was taken by Real’s first galactico, Luis Figo). The similarity would be greatly enhanced by the end of that season, when Zidane inspired Madrid to reach the European Cup final in Glasgow – scene of their infamous 7-3 victory in 1960 versus Eintracht Frankfurt from Germany. During that match the great Di Stefano was at the peak of his powers, scoring a hat-trick. Real’s modern day number 5 couldn’t quite emulate three goals, but scored what is considered the greatest goal in European Cup final history – a tremendous volley with his left foot (his wrong foot) from the edge of the penalty box, to lead Real to a 2-1 win over Bayer Laverkusen…from Germany. He had completed his Holy Grail.

Zidane won further trophy’s whilst in Spain, adding a La Liga championship, a UEFA Supercup and another Intercontinental Cup to his now bursting trophy cabinet. He also claimed a third World Player of the Year award in 2003, making him the joint highest ever recipient (alongside Ronaldo).

Zizou was more than a collection of awards though. To watch him play during his peak was like watching the top ballet star perform, albeit in football boots, such was his elegance and technique when controlling and gliding with the ball. His signature move, the roulette, looked like a graceful pirouette performed in the middle of a clumsy mob, leaving his midfield markers dumfounded and kicking fresh air. His attributes led Michel Platini to observe: ‘Technically, I think he is the king of what’s fundamental in the game – control and passing. I don’t think anyone can match him when it comes to controlling or receiving the ball.’ Brazilian coaching legend Carlos Alberto Parreira put it rather more bluntly, though non-the less complimentary, simply labelling him: ‘a monster!’

Unlike many of the other legendary fantasisti, Zidane wasn’t a great goalscorer, never reaching double figures in Italy or Spain. However, he was most definitely a scorer of great goals. More importantly he was a scorer of decisive goals in big games, especially on the international stage. He scored twice (two identical headers) in the 1998 World Cup final, when France beat Brazil 3-1 to win their first ever (and only) World Cup. During Euro 2000 he scored a sublime free-kick in the quarter-finals versus Spain, then, followed it up scoring a Golden Goal in the semi-final win versus Portugal. Euro 2004 saw a poor French performance but Zidane provided one of the highlights of the competition when scoring twice (a free-kick and a penalty) in injury time, turning a 1-0 defeat into a 2-1 victory versus England during the opening group game. Cementing his place as a legendary World Cup performer in 2006 Zidane scored the winner, another penalty versus Portugal in the semi-final. He then scored (another penalty) again in another World Cup final, giving France an early lead against Italy in what was his final match as a professional footballer (he had announced his retirement from the game before the tournament). Sadly for him, France lost that game. Even sadder was the fact that Zidane wasn’t able to stay on the pitch until the final whistle – having received a red card. Unfortunately for Zizou, red cards also form part of his legend.

As a playmaker Zidane’s expression was all in his creative flair and artistry. However, during his career he was no stranger to some unsavoury incidents on the football pitch. Zidane was sent-off a massive 12 times during his career (including five times at Juventus and twice whilst at Real Madrid) – mostly for retaliation. These violent flashpoints were in direct contrast to his perceived cool persona as he glided around the field, though his brooding, often moody stare also served as a warning; he was a player who would not be bullied. His response to provocation was first noted during his younger days at Cannes. Whilst he never started any trouble, he knew how to take care of himself. As Richard Williams deftly puts it in his excellent book ‘The Perfect 10’, he would respond: ‘in a way that might be expected from a boy formed in a tough quarter of a hard-nosed city, where an injury might be repaid with a headbutt’. Fast forward 18 years and Marco Materazzi was living testament that age had not mellowed Zidane’s own sense of personal justice – a flying headbutt to the Italian’s chest in response to alleged provocation during the 2006 World Cup final. His last act as a professional footballer.

Many forget however, that this was not Zizou’s first red card during a World Cup tournament. Indeed during France’s triumphant World Cup victory in 1998 it is very easy to forget, in all the hysteria of his two headed goals in the final, that he was briefly a French villain. During the second group game versus Saudi Arabia, the balding fantasista inexplicably lost his cool and stamped on the back of the Saudi captain whilst he was lay on the ground after a challenge. It left the watching world mystified, as this time Zidane’s brand of personal justice seemed to come without any direct provocation. The French poster-boy was given a two match suspension, putting ‘Les Bleus’ campaign in jeopardy – the then captain Didier Deschamps summing up the nervous feeling of the nation: ‘I know he’s impulsive, but he’s put us all at risk’. Indeed without Zidane, the French struggled (eventually winning) in their last-16 tie versus Paraguay – which is testament to the effect Zizou had on the national team. This would become a worrying noticeable feature of all the French teams for the next decade; such was Zidane’s stature and ability. With him, they were world beaters, without him they looked also rans. During qualification for the 2006 finals, the French (without Zidane who had announced his international retirement in 2004) almost failed to qualify. Zidane (along with Thuram and Makelele) answered the call to help out his country and was immediately reinstated as captain. In doing so he instantly rejuvenated the French who went on to reach the (ill-fated) final of the tournament – along the way knocking out previous and future champions Brazil and Spain, with Zidane in imperious form and winning the competition’s Most Valuable Player award.

So with this fantasista, we had the beauty and the beast. The grace and the violence. Taking the rough with the smooth, he was one hell of a player – maybe Parreira had described him best after all…he was a monster!

Bio

Born: 23rd June 1972 in Marseille (France)

Height: 1.85m / 6ft 1″

Career

1988-1992: Cannes – 61 apps / 6 goals

1992-1996: Bordeaux – 139 apps / 28 goals

1996-2001: Juventus – 151 apps / 24 goals

2001-2006: Real Madrid – 155 apps / 37 goals

Totals: 506 app / 95 goals

1994-2006: France – 108 caps / 31 goals

Honours

World Player of the Year: 1998, 2000, 2003

Ballon D’Or: 1998

FIFA World Cup: 1998

UEFA European Championship: 2000

UEFA Champions League: 2002

UEFA Supercup: 1996, 2002

Intercontinental Cup: 1996, 2002

Serie A Champions: 1997, 1998

La Liga Champions: 2003

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Soccer Psychology – The Difference Between Winning and Losing

In today’s game of soccer most would argue that the most important person in a team is the coach. But a new position has arisen from the depths of the grandstand and his importance has significantly increased. Can you guess who it is?

Big clubs all over the world are employing Sports psychologists for help and some have even put them on as full time staff. Sports psychology has become the next boom industry as clubs and coaches have discovered the power of soccer psychology.

The difference between winning and losing at the highest level can be separated by a thin white line. All players are extremely fit, skillful, strong and quick. But how many players are confident and mentally strong? Clubs have discovered this and have added psychology to their growing list of weapons.

Players these days have pushed their physical capabilities to the limit and the competitive edge has virtually flattened out. That’s until mental warfare stepped in with the arrival of soccer psychology.

Science has proven that psychology and the right mindset influences and improves soccer performance. Sports psychology also identifies weaknesses and offers counseling to players who might be suffering from a lack of confidence and low self-esteem. They can also monitor motivational levels within a team and assess the whole team on an individual basis.

Soccer psychologists can also identify the different personalities within the team and ensure that these personalities don’t clash and work together. Remember, a champion team will always beat a team of champions. Soccer psychologists make the transition from a team to a championship team look very simple. By correcting the mindset of the players and increasing the player’s confidence the dream of winning silverware becomes a reality.

Soccer over the years has claimed its fair share of victims. Players that have lost all confidence and cannot perform at the levels required have inevitably been shown the door at their respective clubs. How can we stop this? Most players that have lost their confidence also suffer from low self esteem. With low self esteem comes the nerves and anxiety. If you have this problem within your team, the use of a soccer psychologist will solve all your problems. They will help your players relax and also use mental imagery to build on their shattered confidence without even touching a soccer ball.

Sports psychology has been directly linked to team spirit. The greater the team spirit, the greater chance you have of winning trophies. That’s why we see the smaller clubs of Europe beating some of the heavy weights in the champion’s league. Are the players better at the smaller clubs? Or do they have team spirit? From watching the champion’s league, it’s clearly evident what the smaller clubs lack in talent they make up in spirit and confidence.

The main purpose of psychology in soccer is to prevent the players feeling like failures when they lose. By eliminating this feeling, psychologists are protecting the players self esteem. Could self esteem and confidence be the secret ingredient all the big clubs share?

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