Interesting Tips About Soccer Cleats

Soccer cleats have evolved into one of the most popular athletic footwear on the market today. Cleats are generally shoes with low tops. They are designed to be light and tight-fitting to the foot. The shoes also have rounded edges that allow as much solid contact between the soccer ball and the foot as is possible. Soccer has grown in popularity around the world, and will likely continue to gain followers. The market for soccer shoes has therefore widened. Now, soccer shoes can be bought in a variety of sporting shops across the globe. Some of the best deals can be found when you shop for soccer cleats online. Most online retailers carry the best quality cleats available.

Soccer shoes have evolved from shoes that were simply designed to help athletes get a better grip on the ground to specialized shoes that are now designed to enhance various levels of performance. Today, soccer cleats not only help players pivot better on grass, they also are designed to improve your running speed, enhance your touch on the ball, and to help put power on shots.

Today, you can find soccer cleats online that are available in a variety of designs. Cleats are generally now made from lightweight leather. Cleat technology continues to evolve and improve. During the 2010 World Cup, Nike premiered a new concept called adaptive traction technology. This uses special traction pegs that adjust during games according to turf or ground conditions. Soccer cleat evolution will likely continue for years to come.

Soccer cleats should fit your foot snugly. There should be less than a finger's width of space between the tip of your soccer shoe and your toes. Cleats are not a shoe that you buy to grow in to. It is important, both for optimized performance in the game and your safety, that you always wear cleats that fit you snugly. You will perform better in tight-fighting cleats, and will also be less likely to injure yourself during a game. Some older players prefer clears made from kangaroo leather. Kangaroo leather stretches once it is worn and then molds specially to fit the wearer's foot shape.

When you purchase soccer shoes, make sure to take care of your footwear. Cleats are expensive, but when taken care of, they will not only help you improve on the field, but can last a while. When your shoes are wet from sweat after a game, let them dry naturally. Blow-drying them or using other artificial heat can damage the leather that they are made of. If you look, you are bound to find a great pair of soccer cleats that you love. Some athletes have brands that they are loyal to, others prefer to try different cleats every time they purchase new ones. All soccer cleats made today are great shoes. Their price tags can be daunting, but rest assured that you are investing in a good pair of shoes that will drastically help you in your game. Once you know what size you are, try looking for soccer cleats online ; some of the best deals on cleats are found from online retailers. Happy soccer shoe shopping, and good luck in your games!

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Danjeon Breathing for Depression

Danjeon breathing is one of the most effective methods to bring relief to those suffering from depression. Depression places heavy burdens on the family, individual and society and the number of cases of depression are increasing around the world. Economic uncertainty and lack of direction are some of the largest reasons for depression but solutions have been few and far between. Until now.

Danjeon breathing has been a great solution for depression for thousands of years since its discovery around the beginning days of acupuncture. In fact, it's been rare to find many cases of depression through Korean history, and danjeon breathing is one stronger reasons. But first, let's look into the origins of depression to see how danjeon breathing can help.

One theory of depression is that it comes from runaway emotions and negative thinking. At times we have a negative situation in our lives and we do not know how to respond to it, and it leaves an emotional scar or trauma. Or we have problems with our co-workers or friends or loved ones and we end up blaming or criticizing them. Unresolved trauma, months and years of criticism and blame make one tired, exhausted, dark and over time can lead to depression because of a misplaced view of a dark future. Depression often follows from this sequence.

Danjeon breathing is the way out of the darkness and the way to keep one from falling into the cave in the first place. Danjeon breathing rings in 7% more oxygen to the body; not only that, it extends one's breathing and expends the lungs. Slower breathing, deeper breaths allows more oxygen to penetrate to the brain. Longer breathing slows down one's brain waves, producing calm, clarity and happiness.

One then starts to smile naturally from the inside. One begins to have happier thoughts and to see the world with a positive outlook. "The cup is half full," you begin to say. Your understanding of others widens and you can easily put yourself in others' shoes and give them the benefit of the doubt. You think of a bright future, and even if things do not go well today, you see them as merely pebbles on the road rather than a huge barrier. Your positivity overflows and you begin to attract more positive people and prosperity into your life.

With happiness, brightness and understanding, your confidence grows and fears decrease. You step out of the cave of blame and darkness into a field of hope and beauty.

There is really no better natural aid to depression than danjeon breathing.

Indian World Cup Win No Fluke, Suggests Flash Cricket Simulator

Earlier this year, the Indian cricket team won the 2011 edition of the Cricket World Cup. Although India were the favourites leading into the tournament, cricket is a sport where any of the top teams can beat any other on their day. Thanks to the existence of online cricket simulators, we can try to determine what the chances were of India winning, and how the other placings should have gone.

ODI CricSim is a flash cricket simulator that determines the results of matches by crunching over 200 variables from each player’s actual world career, including the average length of a batsman’s innings, the chance of hitting a four or a six on any given ball, the bowler’s strike rate and the bowler’s economy rate. For this experiment I used the ODI CricSim engine to run 1,000 simulated World Cups based on the quarterfinal standings of the various teams. The teams for each match were the same as the teams in the actual world, and in cases where a simulated team advanced when their actual world counterpart did not, the quarterfinal team was used for their next match.

The results were as follows:

First Quarterfinal – Pakistan vs. West Indies:

Pakistan 572
West Indies 428

Second Quarterfinal – India vs. Australia:

India 576
Australia 424

Third Quarterfinal – New Zealand vs. South Africa:

New Zealand 399
South Africa 601

Fourth Quarterfinal – Sri Lanka vs. England:

Sri Lanka 568
England 432

The results from these quarterfinal matchups suggest that New Zealand beating South Africa was the biggest upset of this stage of the tournament. South Africa was the only losing team that the simulator suggested should have won. In fact, South Africa were the team with the highest simulated chance of winning their quarterfinal, which will add more heartbreak to Proteas fans who felt that this tournament was a great chance for their team to break their Cricket World Cup duck.

First Semifinal:

There were four possible matchups for this semifinal, and the following were the predicted chances that the matchup in question would have resulted:

New Zealand vs. England (172 iterations)
New Zealand vs. Sri Lanka (same as actual world) (227 iterations)
South Africa vs. England (260 iterations)
South Africa vs. Sri Lanka (341 iterations)

The simulator results were as follows:

New Zealand vs. England: NZL 105, ENG 67.
New Zealand vs. Sri Lanka: NZL 134, SRL 93.
South Africa vs. England: SAF 181, ENG 79.
South Africa vs. Sri Lanka: SAF 180, SRL 161.

Second Semifinal:

There were four possible matchups for this semifinal, and the following were the predicted chances that the matchup in question would have resulted:

India vs. West Indies (247 iterations)
India vs. Pakistan (same as actual world) (329 iterations)
Australia vs. West Indies (181 iterations)
Australia vs. Pakistan (243 iterations)

The simulator results were as follows:

India vs. West Indies: IND 197, WIN 50.
India vs. Pakistan: IND 238, PAK 91.
Australia vs. West Indies: AUS 138, WIN 43.
Australia vs. Pakistan: AUS 186, PAK 57.

Final:

There were sixteen possible matchups for the final, and the following were the predicted chances that the matchup in question would have resulted:

India vs. South Africa (157 iterations)
India vs. Sri Lanka (same as actual world) (110 iterations)
India vs. New Zealand (104 iterations)
India vs. England (64 iterations)
Australia vs. South Africa (117 iterations)
Australia vs. Sri Lanka (82 iterations)
Australia vs. New Zealand (78 iterations)
Australia vs. England (47 iterations)
Pakistan vs. South Africa (53 iterations)
Pakistan vs. Sri Lanka (38 iterations)
Pakistan vs. New Zealand (35 iterations)
Pakistan vs. England (22 iterations)
West Indies vs. South Africa (34 iterations)
West Indies vs. Sri Lanka (24 iterations)
West Indies vs. New Zealand (22 iterations)
West Indies vs. England (13 iterations)

The simulator results were as follows:

India vs. South Africa: IND 98, SAF 59.
India vs. Sri Lanka: IND 69, SRL 41.
India vs. New Zealand: IND 63, NZL 41.
India vs. England: IND 54, ENG 10.
Australia vs. South Africa: AUS 65, SAF 52.
Australia vs. Sri Lanka: AUS 57, SRL 25.
Australia vs. New Zealand: AUS 47, NZL 31.
Australia vs. England: AUS 37, ENG 10.
Pakistan vs. South Africa: PAK 22, SAF 31.
Pakistan vs. Sri Lanka: PAK 19, SRL 19.
Pakistan vs. New Zealand: PAK 14, NZL 21.
Pakistan vs. England: PAK 12, ENG 9.
West Indies vs. South Africa: WIN 13, SAF 21.
West Indies vs. Sri Lanka: WIN, SRL 14.
West Indies vs. New Zealand: WIN 8, NZL 14.
West Indies vs. England: WIN 6, ENG 7.

These results give the following percentage chances of winning the 2011 Cricket World Cup, given the quarterfinal standings and given that the simulator is accurate:

India 28.5%
Australia 20.6%
South Africa 16.3%
New Zealand 10.7%
Sri Lanka 9.9%
Pakistan 6.7%
West Indies 3.7%
England 3.6%

It is important to note here that these rankings do not reflect the relative merits of each team, but their chances of winning the tournament given the quarterfinal standings and eventual opponents in the semifinals and final. Perhaps disappointingly for the tournament itself, the two top teams met each other in the quarterfinal stages, robbing it of what would have been a titanic final between the eventual champions and the triple defending champions.

When Soccer Came to Brazil

The history of Brazilian soccer is a disorganized one and it comes as no surprise that its origins has many a version! This British sport is said to have arrived in Brazil during the end of the nineteenth century.

One version of the advent of soccer in Brazil claims it all started with the arrival of British and Dutch sailors to the country. The locals learned the routes of the game from these sailors on the beaches of the north eastern coastline. Another version gives credit to a certain Mr. Hugh as the 'father of Brazilian soccer'. It sees Mr. Hugh was the first person to teach the game to the workers of the São Paulo Railway back in 1882. Yet another version prefers a Mr. John as the first coach of soccer, who taught the skills to a team of Leopoldina Railway workers sometimes in 1875.

Now, if that's not confusing, what is it? Well, there's one more version that most people espouse as the 'true story'. According to this popular version, Brazilian soccer owes Charles William Miller for bringing the game to the country. Born in Brazil in the year 1874, Charles left for England for his studies at the age of 10. It was there that he was first came in contact with the sport. Charlie was a natural and soon became a deft dribbler and a free kick and header specialist. An accomplished striker, he won school honors that cave him entry into Southampton Club, and later, the Hampshire County team.

On his return to Brazil in 1894, he bought with him some soccer gear, a rule book and his skill. He formed the first Brazilian football club, the Sao Paolo Athletic Club (SPAC), and even came up with a few new rules! SPAC went on to win the first three championships with Mr. Miller at the helm. His football skills were far superior than his team mates and the 'Chaleira' – a football move invented by him saw him flick the ball with his heel – was named in honor of him. This move is still used by the legends of Brazilian football! The greatest names of the game, Pele, Socrates and Rivelino owe a lot to this pioneer of Brazilian football …

The first official match in Brazil was played in São Paulo back in 1894. Charles Miller had invited the English football teams from Southampton and the Corinthians Club to play against SPAC and other local teams. Charles had so much respect for the Corinthians sense of fair play, he even named a local team after them! And with that, one of Brazil's most popular club was born … It went on to become Brazilian Champion in the year 2005 and had some of the best players Brazil has seen on its roster.

In 1988, SPAC commemorated its centenary with a match against the English Corinthians! The final match had legends like Socrates and Rivelino on the local Corinthian side playing against their English العربية. The local team was leading 1: 0, when Socrates, in the spirit of Corinthian fairness, agreed to change his soccer jersey to play for the English team!

Well, those were the early years of Brazil's love affair with football. It went on to make history as five time World Cup champion and is the only country to have qualified for all 17 World Cups in the tournament's history! Until 2002, Brazil had lost only one World Cup qualifier in 70 years of playing! With its elegant dribbling, lightening speed passes and precision scoring, Brazilian Futebol has been likened to ballet dancing, and more recently, to the rhythmic samba!