No-See-Ems Are a Terrible Pest

No-see-ems are perhaps the most annoying pest. And 2017 is a banner year in the coastal areas of South Carolina and Georgia. But what is a no-see-em and how can you avoid them?

No-see-ems are a very small pest also called sand fleas, sand gnats, midges, punkies or other four letter words not fit to print. They aren't invisible, but certainly small enough that you don't know they are there until you feel their unmistakable bite. If you see them in sunlight, they appear like lint or dust flying in the air. But make no mistake, these lightweight, tiny particles floating around you are there for only one reason – to bite you with razor sharp teeth and suck your blood.

No-see-ems breed in moist soil. This can be the pluff mud at the edge of the marsh, in irrigated yards, and there's a special fondness for athletic fields and golf courses. If you are a soccer player, you know exactly what these blood suckers are!

This coastal area of ​​the world is a delight until the glorious days of Spring and Fall when around dusk, you are repeatedly bitten by the nearly invisible bugs referred to as flying teeth. To the locals, the only true name is No-see-ems.

These annoying pests are magnetized to your carbon dioxide as you exhale. They are also drawn in when you perspire. Their favorite location is your hair as they burrow towards your scalp and begin to feast. Bites of no-see-ems are like tiny, sharp stings as though being pricked with a needle. Then the bites immediately begin to itch.

Some victims are attacked along every square inch of exposed skin with a vengeance matched only by piranhas. Just a few moments outdoors for some can produce dozens of bites. And if you have an allergic reaction, may God help you.

No one is immune and some are like magnets. And the worst part is that if you want to be outside, so do they. Beautiful days with sunny, mild temperatures that beckon us outdoors means these monsters will be lurking.

What to do? Create a personal bubble of protection using a safe, natural product known to control no-see-ems. You can spray yourself, you can infuse your clothes, and you can even create large areas without no-see-ems by putting the product through your irrigation system!

Take back the beautiful days of Spring and Fall and control no-see-ems!

Camiseta 1a Equipación Bayern Munich 18-19 Mujer Comprar Camiseta 1a Equipación Bayern Munich 18-19 Mujer baratas precio más barato y envío rápido y de los mejores equipos y selecciones del mundo de Hombre,Mujer y Niños.

Busyholism Test

While perusing Maria Nemeth’s excellent book The Energy of Money, I came across a phrase I’d never heard before but described my lifestyle far too well for my liking – «Busyholism». Take this «Busyholism Inventory» adapted from the book. (If you’re too busy to take it, you may as well assume you are one and skip ahead to the suggestions which follows!):

Use the following scale to score:

1 = not true at all

2 = somewhat untrue

3 = don’t know

4 = somewhat true

5 = absolutely true

1. I am tired most of the time.

2. I always seem to be in motion.

3. Most of the people in my life (spouse, friends, family) don’t appreciate all I have to do.

4. I get very frustrated if I cannot finish a task or if I’m interrupted and I have to put it off until later.

5. On Sunday (or my day off) I have a list of things I must do before I can play or rest. I rarely get to the play and rest part.

6. I often feel isolated from those I love.

7. By the time I do something I like, I am too tired to really enjoy it.

8. I feel guilty when I am resting or just taking it easy.

9. When I am doing something (such as watching a son or daughter play soccer), I often miss out on the fun because I am too preoccupied with what needs to be done next.

10. I use substances such as caffeine or sugar to prod myself into action during the day, and turn to alcohol, marijuana, or other drugs (prescription or over-the-counter) to relax in the evening.

11. I feel resentful because I am not doing the things I really want to do.

12. I feel that I have more responsibilities than most of my family or friends.

13. I usually do things in a hurry, like gulp my food or throw on clothes.

14. I forget to take care of myself (do not eat, drink water, or use the rest room) for long periods of time.

15. My friends and family tell me they are not seeing enough of me. Or, when I am with them, they tell me I seem withdrawn or emotionally removed.

There are no ‘Cosmo Quiz’ score totals to compare yourself with, but suffice it to say if you identify with any of the above descriptions, you’ll benefit from the suggestions which follow…

1. Take a day out

(Notice I didn’t say a day «off» – that’d never happen, would it?)

Taking a day out to overview your life direction, meaning, and purpose is one of the most powerfully productive things you can do, so even we confirmed busyholics can often justify it to ourselves.

For maximum impact, remove yourself completely from your home and work environment to minimize the siren call of busy distractions. Let’s face it, it’s easier to not answer e-mail or take phone calls when you’re nowhere near a computer or telephone!

2. Slow down and smell the cheese

When my daughter was two, her favourite song was called ‘Slow down and Smell the Cheese’. In the song, a frantic mouse named Tutter is running everywhere, pushing his cheese around the mouse hole, when he finally calls out in exhaustion, ‘So little time, so much cheese to push around!’

Just for today, spend time in the slow lane, literally and metaphorically. Leave yourself some extra time this morning, and drive to work in the slow lane. If you travel by train or bus, make a deal with yourself that you will not rush to catch the next one, no matter what.

As the mouse’s friend, a bear named, appropriately enough, ‘Bear’, sings, ‘Life is so much better when you smell the Feta!’

3. Get support

While there are no official support groups for ‘Busyholism’ (let’s face it, we’re all too busy to attend the meetings!), you can create your own support system. This week, experiment with getting support by making sure that you ask for support at least three times each day – even if (especially if!) you feel like you don’t need it.

Have fun, learn heaps, and chill out!

Camiseta ESTADOS UNIDOS 2ª Equipación 2019 Comprar Camiseta ESTADOS UNIDOS 2ª Equipación 2019 baratas precio más barato y envío rápido y de los mejores equipos y selecciones del mundo de Hombre,Mujer y Niños.

Laced Soccer Shoes – How To Go About Them

Most soccer cleats are laced but you definitely will find a few that does not feature laces and are designed in such a way that they keep the feet in firmly and do not interfere with performance. Lacing is among the most important things you should learn to have an easy time keeping your fit right and also ensuring that the laces do not end up causing any sort of fall risk or injuries. Whether you are getting soccer shoes for your child, youth or you are an advanced soccer player getting a pair, it is important to know the ins and outs of properly tying your laces.

Tips for children

When tying laces on children soccer shoes, the traditional criss-cross lacing pattern is best. The laces should be tight enough to keep the show in place, but not too tight to make the fit uncomfortable.

A traditional bow-knot should finish off the lacing at the top and the ends of the bows tied again to create some sort of granny knot.

It is important to choose laces that are long enough to allow double knotting, but not too long that a lot of bulk is left to flap around or even get caught under the shoe sole once tied. It is best for parents to tie their children’s shoe laces until they are in a position to tie them properly.

Tips for youth players

They should be able to tie the laces by themselves with the criss-cross still being the best pattern. The lace should be threaded underneath both eyelets nearest to shoe toe ensuring that both ends have equal lengths. The underneath threading should be done all the way to the ankle before a bow-tie is tied, followed by a double knot when the show is on.

The laces should remain tightly drawn from bottom to top and a bow knot tied at farthest point outside the feet as the shoes can allow. It helps keep the knot away from the instep to reduce impact on the knot from an instep-drive kick.

Tips for advanced players

Influence on laces is what needs to be focused by the advanced soccer players. The double knot should be away from midline of instep than last eyelet can allow.

The laces should also be tied in such a way that there is no risk of being raked by opponents. The issue can be addressed by using long laces that can go round the foot arch and using a surgeon’s knot to tie them.

Important to note is that some shoes may come with features that can have an effect on lacing. Tongue loops are some of the features and they help in preventing slipping of the tongue to the sides. Some may also come with a tongue flap which is an extended tongue that folds over knots after tying to create smoother instep surface. It is also not uncommon to find shoes with lace sleeves to cover the laces and knots. Choose a design you feel works for you in terms of lacing convenience and ensuring laces do not interfere with your performance.

Portugal 2018 Camiseta de la 2ª equipación Mujer Comprar Portugal 2018 Camiseta de la 2ª equipación Mujer baratas precio más barato y envío rápido y de los mejores equipos y selecciones del mundo de Hombre,Mujer y Niños.

Soccer Coaching – Soccer Tactics Lessons From the World Cup

Below are 8 lessons about soccer tactics and strategy that I learned from the 2010 World Cup:

1. Soccer Formations and Tactics Make a Difference. If you listened to the commentators, they made some excellent points about this. Argentina, for example, played a 4-1-2-1-2 formation which left them defensively strong in the center (between the 2 goals) but vulnerable to attacks down the sideline. (They also had the problem of their Midfielders not going back to help defend). Spain was criticized for continuing to attack down the center when it wasn’t working. The commentators felt they should have attacked down the sidelines and then crossed the ball in to the Center. Germany played a 4-2-3-1 which gave them more width.

2. Adaptability is Critical to Soccer Coaching Success. If you want to beat tough teams, you must be willing to adapt your formation and Style of Play and put players in positions where they can be effective against your competition. An example: The England coach played Defoe instead of Heskey in the critical match against Slovenia and Defoe scored the goal that won the game.

3. Never Give Up. The U.S. had 2 goals disallowed that should have counted — one vs. Slovenia and one vs. Algeria — yet they persevered.

4. «Boom Ball» Can Even Work in the Soccer World Cup. Some people mistake every long ball for a «Boom Ball». That isn’t true, but I will go with that term here for fun. If you have an attacker pushed up and send the ball long and your attacker can win the ball, it is a «tactic» that can result in a scoring opportunity. In England vs. Germany, there were hundreds of short passes, but the first goal scored (in the 19th minute) was on a very long goal kick that Klose ran on to and one-touched for a goal. The fourth goal in that game was also a «Boom Ball» when on a counterattack Germany sent a long ball to a breaking attacker. The Netherlands first goal vs. Slovakia was also a breakaway on a long ball. And in the final, late in the match Spain even started booming the ball to get it away from their goal.

5. Short Corner Kicks («Short Corners») are Better for Youth Soccer Teams. I loved the way Spain mixed up short and long corner kicks. Even the Dutch tried one and had a good chance with it. I recommend Short Corners for youth teams because they teach possession and control.

6. Great Soccer Goalkeeping Makes a Difference. In this World Cup we could see what a difference great goalkeeping makes.

7. Don’t Disrespect Your Opponent, You Might Motivate Them. Maradona disrespected Germany and they crushed Argentina 4-0.

8. Organization and Discipline Usually Beats Lack of Organization and Lack of Discipline. Germany, Spain, Netherlands and Uruguay are all well organized and disciplined.

Zinedine Zidane

Zinedine Zidane, the monk-like fantasista – heir to Platini’s throne as France’s greatest ever player, is also widely regarded as one of the greatest players in the history of the game. Maybe slightly overrated in some quarters when labelled with the ‘Greatest Ever’ tag, his achievements and trophy haul are certainly second to very few. For a time he was also the most expensive player in the world, costing Real Madrid a huge £46m. During his playing days Zidane became one of world football’s true superstars, and much loved players – his global fan base was (and still is) exceptional. From Europe, to North Africa (the origin of his roots) and the Middle East, to Japan – Zidane, was the man.

Zidane was born to Algerian immigrants who firstly moved to Paris, but eventually settled in La Castellane – a suburb with a huge North African community in France’s southern town of Marseille. It was here that Yazid Zidane was born in 1972. Yazid, his birth name, is what he was known by to his friends and family. The young Yazid looked to replicate his idol; Olympic Marseille’s very own fantasista, Uruguayan Enzo Franchescoli, by teaching himself tricks and repetitively juggling a football until he was better than most of the boys in the area. In a neighbourhood high in crime rate Zidane had to become tough, though this was mostly focused through Judo – something else he showed an early talent for. But it was football that won the youngsters heart. After school he would gather with the other boys from his tower block, in ‘Place Tartane’ – an 80 x 12 yard clearing in the middle of the housing complex, which served as a makeshift football pitch. By 13 years old his talent was such that he was spotted by a scout for Cannes who proclaimed: ‘I’ve found a boy who has hands where his feet should be’. After initial scepticism he was allowed to join the club’s ‘centre de formation’, leaving home and his family in the process to lodge with a club director’s family.

By 16 years old he was making his league debut versus Nantes. Then, playing the same opponents two years on, he scored his first senior league goal in a 2-1 win. Remembering the promise he made the young Zidane upon scoring his debut goal, the president rewarded him with a brand new Renault Clio. Unfortunately for the 20 year old Zizou, the Va Va Voom factor wore off pretty quick as Cannes were relegated the very next season. His skills didn’t go unnoticed however and with an offer coming in from Bordeaux, Zidane moved South for approximately £300k, where he would be reunited with his junior international team mate and close friend Christophe Dugarry. They formed part of an exciting new team that made waves in Europe as well as at home, winning the Intertoto Cup in 1995 and finishing runners-up in the UEFA Cup. It was during this period he also made his national team debut in 1994, coming off the bench whilst France were 2-0 down against the Czech Republic, and scoring twice. The press went wild – the new Platini had arrived. People outside of France were now beginning to take notice of Zidane’s attributes. The then Premiership Champions Blackburn Rovers coach Ray Harford expressed an interest in the midfielder, only for Blackburn’s owner Jack Walker to refuse, famously stating: ‘Why do you want to sign Zidane when we have Tim Sherwood?’

Zizou was a relative late bloomer on the world stage. He was already aged 24 when gaining his first major move – Juventus paying a modest £3.2m in 1996 to take him from the Bordeaux side that had starred (particularly against AC Milan) in the previous seasons UEFA Cup. Juve had chosen to snap him up before the summer’s Euro’96 competition in case of any value increase. But after his poor, lacklustre performances during the tournament, they probably saw their new commodity depreciate in value – leading Juventus president Gianni Agnelli to cuttingly remark: ‘is the real Zidane the one I’ve heard so much about, or the one I’ve been watching?’ To be fair to Zidane, he had just completed a mammoth 65-match season. Then on the eve of the Euros, he suffered a car crash. His arrival in Turin signalled more ‘new Platini’ comparisons. But after a difficult period of adjustment to the new league, murmurs of disappointment could be heard throughout the Juve faithful, leading Zidane to announce: ‘I’m Zinedine Zidane and it’s important that the fans understand that I can never be Platini, on or off the pitch.’ He was right. Zidane was a totally different character to the former Juventus number 10, and what’s more that shirt at Juve now belonged to Del Piero. Zidane’s squad number at La Vecchia Signora was 21 – an alien number to a fantasista, however after the frosty start in Turin his performances started to resemble a true fantasista. With winning goals against championship rivals Inter, and by helping Juve secure their second Intercontinental Cup in November versus River Plate, Zidane silenced his doubters. The win was made even sweeter for Zidane as he faced his teenage idol, Enzo Francescoli. The Uruguayan fantasista was ending his career back at the club where he had shot to fame. For Zidane, life couldn’t get any better.

Only it could.

That trophy was the first major of his senior career and sparked a remarkable winning period which would see him collect nearly every major trophy the sport had to offer during an incredible career. His stay at the Turin giants saw him win the Scudetto twice, a UEFA Supercup and another Intertoto Cup. During the same period with France he collected the 1998 World Cup and then followed it up with the European Championship in 2000. The only major trophy which evaded him was the Champions League. He had finished runner-up twice with Juve and now it seemed like his Holy Grail. It was probably a major factor in his decision to leave Juventus in the summer of 2001, when Real Madrid came calling and splashed out a whopping £47m for his services. The Real president Florentino Perez was embarking on his first galactico project, signing the best players in the world. And at this time, nobody was better than Zidane, having also picked up the greatest accolades any individual player could win – the Ballon d’Or in 1998, and World Player of the Year in that same year, whilst also collecting it in 2000. In 1996 when he arrived at Juventus he may have been labelled as an inferior model to the great Platini, but in 2001 he was leaving having certainly surpassed him.

In Spain, Zidane won the watching Bernabeau faithful over instantly. They adored his velvet touch and instant control. His mastery over the ball reminded their older followers of their glorious players from the past – not least their greatest ever player, Alfredo Di Stefano, who’s number 5 shirt Zidane now wore (the number 10 shirt was taken by Real’s first galactico, Luis Figo). The similarity would be greatly enhanced by the end of that season, when Zidane inspired Madrid to reach the European Cup final in Glasgow – scene of their infamous 7-3 victory in 1960 versus Eintracht Frankfurt from Germany. During that match the great Di Stefano was at the peak of his powers, scoring a hat-trick. Real’s modern day number 5 couldn’t quite emulate three goals, but scored what is considered the greatest goal in European Cup final history – a tremendous volley with his left foot (his wrong foot) from the edge of the penalty box, to lead Real to a 2-1 win over Bayer Laverkusen…from Germany. He had completed his Holy Grail.

Zidane won further trophy’s whilst in Spain, adding a La Liga championship, a UEFA Supercup and another Intercontinental Cup to his now bursting trophy cabinet. He also claimed a third World Player of the Year award in 2003, making him the joint highest ever recipient (alongside Ronaldo).

Zizou was more than a collection of awards though. To watch him play during his peak was like watching the top ballet star perform, albeit in football boots, such was his elegance and technique when controlling and gliding with the ball. His signature move, the roulette, looked like a graceful pirouette performed in the middle of a clumsy mob, leaving his midfield markers dumfounded and kicking fresh air. His attributes led Michel Platini to observe: ‘Technically, I think he is the king of what’s fundamental in the game – control and passing. I don’t think anyone can match him when it comes to controlling or receiving the ball.’ Brazilian coaching legend Carlos Alberto Parreira put it rather more bluntly, though non-the less complimentary, simply labelling him: ‘a monster!’

Unlike many of the other legendary fantasisti, Zidane wasn’t a great goalscorer, never reaching double figures in Italy or Spain. However, he was most definitely a scorer of great goals. More importantly he was a scorer of decisive goals in big games, especially on the international stage. He scored twice (two identical headers) in the 1998 World Cup final, when France beat Brazil 3-1 to win their first ever (and only) World Cup. During Euro 2000 he scored a sublime free-kick in the quarter-finals versus Spain, then, followed it up scoring a Golden Goal in the semi-final win versus Portugal. Euro 2004 saw a poor French performance but Zidane provided one of the highlights of the competition when scoring twice (a free-kick and a penalty) in injury time, turning a 1-0 defeat into a 2-1 victory versus England during the opening group game. Cementing his place as a legendary World Cup performer in 2006 Zidane scored the winner, another penalty versus Portugal in the semi-final. He then scored (another penalty) again in another World Cup final, giving France an early lead against Italy in what was his final match as a professional footballer (he had announced his retirement from the game before the tournament). Sadly for him, France lost that game. Even sadder was the fact that Zidane wasn’t able to stay on the pitch until the final whistle – having received a red card. Unfortunately for Zizou, red cards also form part of his legend.

As a playmaker Zidane’s expression was all in his creative flair and artistry. However, during his career he was no stranger to some unsavoury incidents on the football pitch. Zidane was sent-off a massive 12 times during his career (including five times at Juventus and twice whilst at Real Madrid) – mostly for retaliation. These violent flashpoints were in direct contrast to his perceived cool persona as he glided around the field, though his brooding, often moody stare also served as a warning; he was a player who would not be bullied. His response to provocation was first noted during his younger days at Cannes. Whilst he never started any trouble, he knew how to take care of himself. As Richard Williams deftly puts it in his excellent book ‘The Perfect 10’, he would respond: ‘in a way that might be expected from a boy formed in a tough quarter of a hard-nosed city, where an injury might be repaid with a headbutt’. Fast forward 18 years and Marco Materazzi was living testament that age had not mellowed Zidane’s own sense of personal justice – a flying headbutt to the Italian’s chest in response to alleged provocation during the 2006 World Cup final. His last act as a professional footballer.

Many forget however, that this was not Zizou’s first red card during a World Cup tournament. Indeed during France’s triumphant World Cup victory in 1998 it is very easy to forget, in all the hysteria of his two headed goals in the final, that he was briefly a French villain. During the second group game versus Saudi Arabia, the balding fantasista inexplicably lost his cool and stamped on the back of the Saudi captain whilst he was lay on the ground after a challenge. It left the watching world mystified, as this time Zidane’s brand of personal justice seemed to come without any direct provocation. The French poster-boy was given a two match suspension, putting ‘Les Bleus’ campaign in jeopardy – the then captain Didier Deschamps summing up the nervous feeling of the nation: ‘I know he’s impulsive, but he’s put us all at risk’. Indeed without Zidane, the French struggled (eventually winning) in their last-16 tie versus Paraguay – which is testament to the effect Zizou had on the national team. This would become a worrying noticeable feature of all the French teams for the next decade; such was Zidane’s stature and ability. With him, they were world beaters, without him they looked also rans. During qualification for the 2006 finals, the French (without Zidane who had announced his international retirement in 2004) almost failed to qualify. Zidane (along with Thuram and Makelele) answered the call to help out his country and was immediately reinstated as captain. In doing so he instantly rejuvenated the French who went on to reach the (ill-fated) final of the tournament – along the way knocking out previous and future champions Brazil and Spain, with Zidane in imperious form and winning the competition’s Most Valuable Player award.

So with this fantasista, we had the beauty and the beast. The grace and the violence. Taking the rough with the smooth, he was one hell of a player – maybe Parreira had described him best after all…he was a monster!

Bio

Born: 23rd June 1972 in Marseille (France)

Height: 1.85m / 6ft 1″

Career

1988-1992: Cannes – 61 apps / 6 goals

1992-1996: Bordeaux – 139 apps / 28 goals

1996-2001: Juventus – 151 apps / 24 goals

2001-2006: Real Madrid – 155 apps / 37 goals

Totals: 506 app / 95 goals

1994-2006: France – 108 caps / 31 goals

Honours

World Player of the Year: 1998, 2000, 2003

Ballon D’Or: 1998

FIFA World Cup: 1998

UEFA European Championship: 2000

UEFA Champions League: 2002

UEFA Supercup: 1996, 2002

Intercontinental Cup: 1996, 2002

Serie A Champions: 1997, 1998

La Liga Champions: 2003

Compra online tu Camisetas de Futbol Barata a precios muy rebajados en futbolmania.com | Las mejores ofertas en camisetas oficiales | Devoluciones gratis.