3 Unusual Things That Can Make A Difference With Your Soccer Cleats

There are plenty of options when it comes to soccer cleats thanks to the many brands developing new designs and series every once in a while. Your football boots may do little in improving your skills on the pitch, but they do play a huge role in how you perform while out there and how easy it is for you to use your football playing skills. For this reason, you definitely need to get yourself a pair of boots that works for your style of play to be able to achieve your objectives during play.

When buying soccer cleats, players check out the usual elements like sizing, brand, materials and cost of the cleat. However, by digging more into details that are not that commonly checked out, you increase your chances of finding soccer cleats that offer so much more than just a pair of boots to protect your feet during play. Here are some of the unusual things you should consider checking out when buying your next football boots to get a pair you will simply love using.

1. Stud configuration

Boot companies are going beyond the usual when it comes to stud configuration and traction. Some have embraced innovative configurations that provide new traction type like the extreme positioning of rear tripod studs so that early ground contact and stability is achieved with the high velocity release. In some cases the misaligned studs come with forefoot studs to allow excellent traction as well as explosive acceleration. You can also find two blade heel design which caters to acceleration and allows the studs to penetrate and at the same time release off the surface even when you are at your fastest speed possible. Check out what the stud configurations means to your performance and get yourself a cleat that will make a difference for you during play.

2. Missing tongue

It may sound weird because everyone is used to boots and shoes that have tongues. However, the missing tongue is not a mistake, but actually an intentional removal that eliminates flapping that most players may have experienced before. A number of brands are embracing the no tongue boot design to reduce weight of the boot and to also manage creating a better looking boots overall. With the tongue missing, the companies have created comfortable fits around the ankles so you still enjoy comfort even with the tongue removed.

3. Foam insert

90 minutes of play can seem like years when you have little cushioning for your feet. With all the running and kicking, you definitely deserve an insert that eases your feet in the most comfortable of ways throughout the game. A thick insole that offers a responsive and spongy feel would be the best for this. Football boot brands use different materials, but boots that feature 4D foam inserts seem to be quite impressive in terms of comfort and balance. Check out the type of foam insert that comes with your pair of cleats and make a good choice for the sake of your feet.

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Why the Right Size Matters When Buying Soccer Cleats

Soccer shoes are very important because of the role they play in keeping your feet protected, creating traction and offering strong grip to ensure that your performance in the field is improved. Every player wishes to give their best performance in during matches and this is something that can prove hard to do without the right soccer cleats.

Fortunately, there are so many brands and designs from which players can choose what they find most suitable. But to get the best pair there are elements that matter most and size is one of these elements. No matter how beautiful a soccer shoe is or how many features it has to give you the best experience when playing, if it is ill-fitting, and then you stand to be frustrated when you are supposed to give your best. Your cleats should neither be too small nor too big otherwise they will interfere with your performance. It is of importance that you pay close attention to sizing so you get the perfect fit for your feet. If you are still wondering why size matters, here are a few reasons why.

· Soccer cleats that are too big will only hinder proper movement as they are likely to come off and they definitely will lag you behind.

· Too small a size on the other hand will keep your feet too tight and this is not only uncomfortable, but also exposes you to bruises and blisters.

· You are more prone to getting injured when wearing a bigger sized cleat because your feet do not have control since the conformity is all wrong. You may end up twisting your leg and probably even falling down as you run around in the field.

Getting the perfect size

The easiest way of getting the right size when buying soccer cleats is knowing your foot measurements. You also want to take into consideration factors such as wearing socks and how the type of socks you choose will affect the size of the shoe. Some socks are quite thick and they can make your cleat feel tighter and smaller.

Since there are manufacturers out there who make midway sizes like 7.5 or 6.5, you should consider such sizes if you have a hard time finding the right cleat size. The shoe should fit snugly but not too tightly. Think about the upper and what it is made of. The upper should mold to your feet as much as possible; remember that some materials like leather have a tendency of stretching over time.

When looking at the size, pay attention to areas where the ball will contact the show most. The toe box, instep, outer edge and upper edge are the most important to help you get a shoe that is proportioned to your foot shape. This will not only ensure you remain comfortable, but also reduces break-in time and gives you ball control in no time at all. Always try on your shoes if you can before making the purchase.

Camiseta Stadium de la 2ª equipación del Atlético de Madrid 2018-19 Camiseta Stadium de la 2ª equipación del Atlético de Madrid 2018-19

The Tea Ceremony Around the Globe

2737BC. The passage of time from 2737BC to 2014 is almost incomprehensible to me. The change, the modernisation, the evolution. What is the significance of this date?

This is the year tea was discovered.

Yes, in 2737BC, in China, the Chinese emperor stumbled across a mysterious potion after leaves from the camellia sinensis plant accidentally fell into the water his servant was boiling for him to drink. As a herbalist, he embraced the opportunity to try a new concoction, sipped the delicate liqueur and immediately fell in love; a love that has been shared by billions of people since.

But it is mind blowing to think that tea has been consumed by people for over 4000 years. And perhaps even stranger to think that in Britain, we have only been drinking tea (our saviour, our comfort, our ‘pack-your-kettle-last-so-it’s-the-first-thing-out-the-lorry’) for a short 400 years.

Even so, this is an incredible amount of time to develop the traditions and conventions associated with drinking it, and the tea drinking ritual is one steeped in cultural customs.

It is perhaps a generalisation, but when we think of tea drinking rituals, it is the Chinese and Japanese tea ceremonies that immediately spring to mind: formality, silence, connections to nature, tea as a gift, a way of offering thanks or apologies to a relative.

Rule-governed and purposeful tea drinking? The officialism appears alien to us.

On reflection though, perhaps there is ritualism in our own tea consumption. Doesn’t tea follow meal times, help calm our nerves, welcome us home after work, or welcome friends over (imagine not offering a friend a brew after knocking on your door. Ultimate social faux pas), lift our spirits and console us? Although we do not wear robes or kneel down, tea does have significance: comfort, safety, friendship. If this isn’t our tradition, then I don’t know what is.

Tea is not just enjoyed in the countries mentioned above. Tea has successfully bewitched people in every continent across the globe, which has led to it being branded as the second most widely consumed beverage on the planet after water. Tea’s ability to permeate cultures has arguably enabled it to survive these 4000 years, each bringing their own traditions and quirks in which to celebrate this distinctive liquid.

And this is what we will here explore; how tea drinking traditions differ in some of the top tea drinking regions of the world.

China

As mentioned above, in China the consumption of tea is ceremonial. Not only do the Chinese people celebrate tea, but they use tea to formally celebrate or consolidate occasions, such as serving tea at family gatherings, as a symbol of formal apology and as a way of politely addressing and thanking parents for the giving and receiving of partners at weddings.

It is the tastes and aromas of the tea which are at the heart of the ritual. Each utensil is carefully washed or cleansed using the first infusion of the green tea leaves to ensure that the second infusion’s taste is not coloured by any foreign bodies, like dust particles, so the tea is pure.

Importantly as well is the way the tea is poured; slowly, in one motion, across all cups (which are small clay pots) and only half full. The other half of the cup is said to be filled with friendship and affection; therefore binding host and guest in their tea drinking experience.

Japan

In Japan, the tea ceremony centres around the making of Japanese Matcha tea; a green tea ground to a fine powder which is world renowned for its excellent healing powers, high concentration of antioxidants and rather bitter taste.

The ceremony is named Chanoyu and focuses on the aesthetics of tea making rather than the taste or smells, making the experience more of a choreographed performance than a quenching of thirst.

The ceremony’s composition dates back to the twelfth century and involves the host’s serving of the tea, as well as the presentation of the utensils and ceramics used to prepare it, the arrangement of flowers in the space and calligraphy. These items can all be modified by the host to best fit the occasion for which the tea is served. It is also the host’s task to have considered their guests’ view of the tea at every angle in the space, to ensure that their experience will be one of purity, serenity and tranquility: a weighty responsibility.

The thoughtful consideration that is required for a successful ceremony often ensures that the bonds of friendship between the hosts and their guests are strengthened after the experience is concluded.

India.

In India, tea is served on the streets by Chai Wallahs, or ‘tea makers’, who blend their spicy chai tea on their stalls at train stations, bus stations and on every street corner.

Authentic chai is milky, sweet and spicy, made from thick buffalo milk, Assam tea, cardamom pods, ginger, cinnamon and often what seems like a ton of sugar. The ingredients can vary, but the ritual of serving generally stays the same: the Chai Wallah brews up all of the ingredients in a large metal pot over open coals which are placed on the stone ground. Once simmering, he pours the liquid through a sieve into a teakettle, then pours the chai into small terracotta pots from a great height. The drinking cups are only used once; consumers throwing them to the ground once they have finished, smashing them to pieces, to allow the clay to get trampled back into the ground.

Chai’s popularity in the UK has steadily grown in the past year (it’s one if our best sellers!) and it’s easy to see why. Chai tea is delicious; warming, spicy, soothing, it’s like Christmas in a cup and yet I drink it all year round! OK, we like to have it our way- we tend to brew Chai with hot water rather than in hot milk and individual consumers choose whether to sweeten delicately with honey- but the resulting comfort is the same.

Equally, much of India’s tea is renowned for its medicinal properties, mainly because of the strong ties to Hinduism and Ayurvedic tradition: a system that inspires us to live by alternative medicine, ultimately governed through a healthy and balanced lifestyle. Tea blends are therefore steeped in a philosophy that inspires the ‘art of living wisely’.

Russia

Rather like the UK, Russia was introduced to tea in the mid-1600s, but whereas we strove to steal the idea from China, the Russian Tsar was given tea as a gift from the Chinese ambassador to Moscow. Of course, he loved it (who doesn’t), and quickly a line of trade was organised between the two countries.

Tea in Russia is not just about the liquid itself but about the heat that brewing the tea gives rise to, and the warmth felt through consumption (Russia can get a little chilly at times). Russia’s tea ceremony is therefore centred around the use of a samovar; a large metal tea urn with decorative handles and a spout.

Typically, the samovar has more than one layer to it. Simple samovars have a bottom layer housing the hot water, which is actually heated by filling the small soldered pipe that runs through the centre of the urn with hot coals. Above this sits a small metal teapot, often of the same metal material, and a concentrated form of brewed tea, zavarka, is made here before being diluted by the hot water from the urn.

Russian Caravan tea (so named as a result of the camel trains that first brought tea to Russia) must be mentioned here. It is the perfect blend to brew in a samovar as the teas used have strong, dark flavours: Chinese Keemun and Formosa Oolong tea, sometimes with hints of Indian black teas like Assam to add a maltiness to the blend.

Morocco

Inshas Allah, ‘with god willing, all good things come with time.’ This is the proverb by which Moroccan people brew their tea and signifies the respect they show to the timely process of making the perfect cup.

Morocco is famous for its Moroccan Mint tea; a blend of Chinese green tea, fresh mint leaves and a lot of sugar (often five times the amount of sugar to the amount of tea!)

The tea making ritual is one of leisure in Morocco and if invited to assist in making the tea, you are honoured. Incense is lit and those who are taking part in the serving wash their hands in orange blossom water before they begin.

Firstly, loose green tea leaves are placed in a round bellied teapot with a conical top and long curved spout, and hot water added. Much like in China, the first infusion (left to brew for just one minute, before being poured into a tall glass) is used as a cleanser, this time for the leaves rather than the flasks, to rid any impurities the leaves may have picked up through travel. After this, the loose tea is brewed before adding the sugar and mint.

The spout is one of importance to the teapot. Curvature to the spout allows for the server to pour the tea from a height of around half a metre into the small glasses below, to create a frothy foam on the tea’s surface.

Tea is served often in Morocco: after each mealtime, when entering some shops, to welcome guests in the home and even to mark business deals.

Iran

Tea is also the national beverage in Iran, with tea drinkers enjoying mainly green tea and black tea to quench their thirst or as a comfort, respectively. No occasion can take place without tea being served and, in many regions of Iran, light coloured tea is a marker of disrespect from the host to the receiver. Principally, Iranians like it strong.

Perhaps it is the liking for a keen strength to tea that has led the people of Iran to discount the water as a part of the tea. Through the use of a samovar, Iranians heat the water and simply use and see it as a way of extracting the aromas and flavours thickly from the leaves.

Typically, tea is drunk from glassware and this is held by the rim of the glass between the thumb and forefinger with the pinkie used to balance. Often, held in the other hand, is a large pipe connected to a hookah, or qalyoon as it’s locally known; a tall, ornate smoking device that uses hot flavoured tobacco and water. In the absence of alcohol, tea houses, where tea and the qalyoon are served hand-in-hand, act as a social hub where young Iranian people can relax and socialise, much like us westerners would do in our local pub.

Kazakhstan

Kazakhstan is another of the world’s biggest tea-drinking countries, with its tradition once again being rooted in the giving and receiving of tea as an act of welcoming and politeness. Guests are offered tea on arrival into a host’s home and it is considered impolite to refuse the beverage.

Kazakhs are known, much like the Russians and Turks, to use samovars to brew and serve the tea; however, differently to the Russians, the server only fills the kasirs (which are small, wide-mouthed saucers), to around half full. This ensures that the tea is always served hot: no one likes a cold cuppa (unless it’s iced, of course).

The guests to the ceremony are then required to pass their empty kasirs back to the female host as a way if thanking her and showing her respect for that which they have received. She then ‘re-half-fills’ the cups and passes them to her guests once more; a process which continues, creating a graceful, rhythmic and visual ceremony, beauteous to behold.

Britain

In Britain, (one might have known!) our tea traditions involve food. These customs were developed in the early 19th century, first by the upper classes who championed Afternoon Tea as a way of bridging the gap between lunch, at 12 o clock, and dinner at 8 o clock. Tea was served at around 4 o clock in the afternoon along with small sandwiches, scones and cakes. Heaven.

High Tea is different, although sometimes (incorrectly) the terms are used interchangeably.

In industrial Britain, workers home from the factories and mines would require immediate sustenance after a day of physical hard labour, and so a substantial meal would be served to them accompanied by a cup of strong, sweet tea at around 5 o clock. This became known as ‘tea’ (which us northerners still to this day sometimes use), and the ‘high’ aspect is a reference to high backed chairs and higher table the lower classes would sit at to enjoy their tea (whereas the upper classes would be seated in low lounge chairs and have their tea served on smaller, occasional tables.)

Taking time to enjoy tea has always been important in this country regardless of class, right up until the invention of the teabag. When the teabag was born, a dip in quality occurred. Beautiful unfurling leaves slowly releasing layers of flavour no longer existed: a throwaway pouch of powdery black dust, bitter to taste and quick-to-brew lay in its place. We are committed to changing that. Lovers of loose leaf, we are promoting taking time out from your day to enjoy the perfect cup of tea, slowly brewed from high quality leaves. We are bringing back the ‘good old days’.

Madrid: One of the Sexiest Cities

On the night that I arrived to Madrid, I had slowly settled in to my friend David's city center flat. I slipped into bed and cracked open the window of the guest room and a cool Spanish breeze welcomed itself in. As I breathed in the chill midnight air and released a long sigh, I thought to myself, "This place is truly wonderful."

The three months that I had spent in Spain I was able to visit a competent of cities; Madrid, Barcelona, ​​San Sebastian, Bilbao, Toledo, Alcala de Henares, Córdoba, Aranjuez, Móstoles, and Patones (for climbing). Of these cities, I've spent the major of the time in Madrid, and after the trip came to an end, I had come to the conclusion that Madrid is a seriously sexy city.

As discretion, I should add that I am in no way claiming that Madrid is "the" sexiest city in the world (although I'll probably have a few Madrileños who will tell me otherwise). I am simply stating that Madrid is one of the sexiest cities. I also know that I was not the first to visit the cities of Spain and certainly was not the first to explore the subcultures of the country, but Madrid's modern yet historical characteristics were nothing short of charming.

Of all the things I have considered, the following things on the list were the most significant:

Cost of Food:

Food is pretty cheap in Madrid, and while cheap is not often synonymous with sexy, your ability to enjoy luxuries (in some cases even like eating out,) is more probable, especially when your dollar is able to go a little further. In restaurants like "El Tigre", you order a drink and get a free platter of tapas. Granted they're not mind-blowing, you can still have a great time socializing with friends without busting your budget.

Curfew:

When I had to take an early flight to Belgium, I had to take a cab at 4am in order to get to the bus stop in the center of Madrid. I was afraid, very afraid, but also very determined.

Being the smart girl I was, I decided that dressing like I was homeless would be the most effective in deterring criminal. After all, criminals do not mess with other criminals.

As soon as I arrived to my bus stop though, I was both amazed and relieved to see tons of people sprawled all over the streets. I'm not talking 20-something partiers or ravers, mind you. The people have the mindset of work-to-live, not the live-to-work mindset that most North American's are familiar with. That mean two-hour lunch breaks as opposed to our one-hour (or even even half-hour) lunch breaks. Thankfully for me, that also meant that at 3am, all sorts of people of all ages were still out on the street. There was no stigma that only partiers or ravers were out at that hour, people were out simply because they want more time to spend with their friends. How they're still able to go to work in the morning? Do not ask me …

Fashion:

In Madrid, fashion is not reserved for the runway. I'm sorry Vancouver, but you're not winning any rewards here. From what I've observed, people dressed better in Madrid, period. The choice of clothing that was worn on a daily basis, even on a grocery store trip, would be me, trying. I'm not sure if that's knocking Vancouver's style or just my own personal ability to dress myself, but I digress. Does it help that Zara was born in Spain? Probably not.

Patios:

When I'm with friends in Vancouver, hanging out is going for a hike or heading to the beach to soak up the sun. We are after all, located in a spectacular coastal location, surrounded by stunning and chiefly pristine nature … but in Madrid, a city far from nature or the coast, hanging out more often than not intent grabbing drinks at a Patio, or " Terraza "as the locals called it. (That's pronounced Terra (tha), by the way.)

In this Spanish city, chances are there will be a terraza not far from your doorstep, and it will be quite good. It was also here that I learned the art of Patio-hopping. You see, as a North American, when I go to a restaurant to eat, I will eat, and then I will pay and leave. (We do not like to be the inconsiderate jerks that occupy an otherwise empty table.) But when you're in Madrid, you eat, and then you talk with your friends for an hour, and then you order more drinks. When you finally pay and leave, you head to another terraza and get more drinks. I will not lie, it seemed like overkill to me, but that my dear friends, is patio-hopping … (and I also solemnly swear that I am not an alcoholic).

Patio-hopping never-the-less is an art, or in my case, an art of being patient … or the art of not asking why we have to stay for so goddamn long.

Architecture:

Modern yet classical; with a country this old, it's hardly a surprise that a city as metropolitan as Madrid could stay fixed to it's roots. From the Museo Nacional Del Prado (which boasts some of the world's finest arts) to Parque del Retiro (which once belonged to the Spanish monarchy), the architecture somehow still remained relevant to this day. When you feel uninspired, you can also head to the Palacio de Cristal to get some creative stimulus.

Culture:

At the end of the day, I could only chalk it up to culture. The overwhelming feeling of unity, when Real Madrid played against Atlético Madrid in the Plaza de Cibeles during the World Cup of 2014, was enough to explain why the city was so sexy, and it all boils down to passion. Madrileños feel a strong passion towards their city, the same way that Vancouverites feel a strong passion towards the outdoors, and it's a thing I quickly learned to respect. I love my own city of Vancouver to bits, and as an overall outdoorsy girl, I would have it no other way. But after living in a city like Madrid where the allure of the city will reel you in one way or another, I can honestly say that this city will no less place as one of the sexiest cities in my books.

Artificial Grass in Europe

The artificial grass industry has expanded to international territories across the globe throughout the years, including Europe. With large sports industries like football (or soccer in America) and rugby, Europe has utilized artificial grass for many purposes. From Germany and the UK, to different parts of the Netherlands, artificial grass continues to be a growing trend and a popular alternative to real grass in Europe. The continent is booming with locals, tourists, and a history that dates back extensively. Traditional architecture and landmarks are of great significance to Europe. Thus, the use of artificial grass exhibits its ability to both blend in with and accommodate the European style.

Like the US, Europe takes an active approach on ecological awareness and going green. In 2007, it was noted as one of the leading continents in the global conservation movement by international media outlets. The installation of artificial grass in both public areas, as well as residential areas continues to play a large role in the continent’s going green. Its ability to save money on water and maintenance costs has helped in the financial sector, yielding its return on investment in approximately 10 years. With the aesthetic standard of natural European gardens, synthetic grass proves to look natural, and fits this clean and beautiful standard seen in many natural and historic gardens.

Artificial turf used for sports is one of the most commonly used turf products in Europe. With sports like rugby and soccer, which require a durable and safe pitch to play on, artificial turf has been a significant surface. Artificial turf for pitches has been recognized by global associations, including FIFA. The World Cup, UEFA, as well as the Champions League also recognize synthetic grass based upon extensive testing. Much like the pitches in the World Cup, a mix of natural grass, and intricately woven synthetic grass fibers make up pitches used by Liverpool FC, as well as Tottenham Hotsupur. Though not entirely made of artificial grass, this weave requires minimal maintenance, as the artificial grass blades prevent natural growth of the real grass. Athletic artificial turf thus proves to be sturdy for performance even on the professional level.

Landscaping for both private and public areas continues to increase in different parts of Europe. Many artificial grass suppliers in the UK have gained much business this summer for landscape jobs. Local gardeners and installers have been employed to do artificial turf jobs in residential areas. This is because word of mouth has boosted the trend of synthetic grass in UK neighborhoods. Aside from conserving energy, water, and money, many homeowners enjoy the versatility of synthetic grass. Landscapers this summer have worked on several jobs for households with children, customizing turf for child-friendly play. Public parks and playground projects are also increasing in popularity, as the controversy about possible health risks has been put to rest. Its adaptability and customizable aspect bolsters the popularity and boom of the artificial grass industry in Europe. From professional sports pitches to residential neighborhoods, Europe continues to benefit from the many advantages offered by modern artificial grass.

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Liverpool FC – The History Of The Badge And The Meaning Of The Crest

Liverpool Football Club are one of the most successful teams in English and European football history, and the club not only has massive support in England but also around the world, the club probably has many millions of fans. Liverpool were founded in 1892 and have won 18 League titles, seven FA Cups and famously, they are five times winners of the European Cup and Champions League, combined.

The club badge or crest, is the epitome of this famous club, and the badge on their shirt is often kissed by the players when celebrating a goal or a victory, as a sign of loyalty and love for the club. The badge has changed considerably since the formation of the club well over a hundred years ago, but today’s crest has much significance about the history and tradition of this famous football club.

The club badge is predominantly based on the city’s famous Liver Bird, which has represented the city for many centuries. The mythical bird, which many believe to have been derived from a cormorant, can be seen on the top of the clock towers on the Royal Liver Building, where two famous Liver birds sculptures dominate the building and overlook the River Mersey, and they date back to 1911. Many modern myths have evolved regarding the origin of the Liver bird, but it is widely accepted that they watch over and protect the people of Liverpool and myth dictates that should they ever leave, the river Mersey would burst its banks and flood the city.

The Liver bird dominates the centre of the Liverpool badge, which is placed inside a shield. The image of the Liver bird on the badge has a short head and curved beak, which is more usually associated with a bird of prey rather than a cormorant, but it retains the sprig of laver, a type of seaweed, in its mouth.

In 2008, Liverpool FC attempted to claim copyright for the Liver bird image, but they failed in their attempt as it was deemed that the Liver bird belonged to all the people of Liverpool and not one company or organisation. The Liver bird image is also used by several other organisations.

Above the shield is a representation of the famous Shankly Gates, which were erected outside the Anfield Stadium in 1982, as a tribute to Liverpool’s former and most famous manager Bill Shankly, who had led Liverpool from Second Division mediocrity, to win three League titles, two FA Cups and the UEFA Cup. Bill Shankly is regarded by most fans as the greatest Liverpool manager, by the way he transformed the club.

Across the top of the Shankly Gates, and portrayed in the badge, are the words You’ll Never Walk Alone, which is the title of the song by Gerry and the Pacemakers that has been adopted by Liverpool fans as the club’s anthem, this again stems during Shankly’s time as manager, and is still sung reverently by Liverpool fans today.

The twin flames either side of the shield are symbolic of the Hillsborough memorial outside Anfield, where an eternal flame burns in memory of the 96 Liverpool fans who tragically died in the Hillsborough disaster of 1989, when the fans were crushed due to overcrowding during Liverpool’s FA Cup semi final against Nottingham Forest, 766 fans were also injured in the disaster.

The date of the formation of the club is clearly displayed below the shield, and while the club crest has changed a number of times over the years, it symbolises some of the most important events in the history of the club, the badge is worn with honour and pride by both players and fans alike.

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Unforgettable European Games

In 1981-1982 Universitatea Craiova played in European Champions Cup, the old name of Champions League of today. After two double games against Olimpyakos Pireu and BK Copenhagen, Craiova had as a guest the great German football team which was Bayern Munich a team in which were players like Breitner, Rummenigge an so on.It was a dramatical game with a stadium of 45.000 places full of Universitatea Craiova’s fans. Our team lost this game with 1-2 but this was just a preview for the next year. The year of the most important European performances for this great Romanian fooball team.

In 1982-1983 Universitatea Craiova played in UEFA Cup. The first game was against AC Fiorentina. A team of the well known World Champion Antobelli. Universitatea was the winner (3-1 and 0-1) and in the second tour we encountered Shamrock Rovers. 2-0 and 3-0 were the results and for the 3rd tour the well known France team was meant to came in Craiova.

Girondins de Bordeaux lost this double game against this legendary Romanian team (0-1 and 2-0). In the 4th tour 1FC Kaiserslautern came in Craiova. After 2-3 in Germany we did a 1-0 in the minute 82 and Universitatea Craiova was preparing for UEFA Cup semifinals. Stefanescu and Breitner

Benfica Lisboa was the team who put an end to this beautiful dream. We managed a full of hope 0-0 in Portugal. But in Romania we missed only 45 minutes for the great final. Ilie Balaci scored in the 15th minute of the game by a great execution from a free kick. In the second time of the game Benfica succeeded a draw and this team went in the final. This performance was never done by a future team from Craiova.

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FC Barcelona Facts – History of Spanish Giants

FC Barcelona, one of the world’s richest and most successful clubs, has a rich history and a culture that is synonymous with the Catalonian part of Spain. Founded in 1899 by a group of English, Swiss and Spanish footballers led by Joan Gamper, the club has grown in stature with every passing day since its inception and managed to achieve the highest stature in club football by winning all the trophies that is possible by the side to win. Here are a few more interesting FC Barcelona facts for the readers’ digest.

Since its inception, the club has won many trophies in both domestic and big competitions. Barcelona has been a club with arguably the best forward line in modern football. Back in 1910 when the club was relatively new and was full of players unknown and no fan following, they used to play matches with local clubs. It was back in the same year when they participated in the first ever UEFA competition. This was followed by a collaboration with the Football Association of Spain. Barton along with a host of other clubs propounded the theory of inventing and creating a new league for the top tier of Spanish football where teams would participate and the ultimate winner would be the best club of Spain.

Barcelona along with Atletic Bilbao and arch rivals Real Madrid remain the only 3 teams till date to have never been relegated from the top tier of Spanish football. Barcelona always has a political history as the club considered to be the heart of Catalonia, which had been an area of disturbance in Spain as the region openly resisted the policies set by the Capital of Spain, Madrid. Catalonia has always been a part of Spain and it was during the late 2000 when the Spanish government allowed Catalonia to break away from Spain and create their own state. Barcelona, till date, has won a sextet and ten Champions League trophies which is in itself a big feat.

Barcelona saw real progress back in 1978 when Nunez was appointed as the president of the club. His main objective was to make Barcelona a world-class team and a brand throughout the world. He remained at the club for 22 years and had set stringent wage policies to make sure that no Ayer becomes bigger than the club itself. He let go of star players likes of Romario, Ronaldo and Maradona just because he would not meet the unrealistic demands set by them back then. The team became invincible under the leadership of Johan Cruyff as he built a dream team consisting of a core of Spanish and English players like Pep Guardiola and Ronald Koeman.

The Barcelona team became a dream team and Cruyff’s tactics was highly appreciated as he would bring the ideology of introducing total foot for the first team in the game. After the resignation of Nunez as president, the La Porter saw the club decline further. They won back their lost glory in 2008 when the club came back to the mainframe with the signing of Brazilian superstar Ronaldinho who decimated Real Madrid single-handedly. What followed after being the exponential meteoric rise of Lionel Messi through the amateur ranks at the club and it went on to win the Champions League along with La Liga and the Copa del Ray.

The club is ranked among the richest club in the world with a net property of nearly 2 billion pounds. Barcelona is a club to be feared and continues to hold the legendary status.

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Spanish Famous Soccer Players

Soccer is the most popular sport in Spain. The Spain soccer team is a superior team and has produced the famous Spanish soccer players for years. As a national team, Spain was not able to achieve any success in FIFA world cup except the 1998 world cup. The team reached the quarterfinal stage by winning eight matches. This was only the best impressive performance in FIFA games where they lost to France. Spain participated in eleven world cups and it was ranked number four in 1950.

Though superior, the world cup squad never gave good results. The famous Spanish soccer players are Luis Suarez, Raul Gonzalez Blanco, Kubala, Alfredo Di Stefano, and the goalkeeper Zamora. Also, Michel, Santillana, and Butragueno are the rising stars of Spanish national team. Most interestingly, the world famous Spanish clubs such as Real Madrid and Barcelona have provided Spanish soccer with best world famous players. The Spanish clubs are more popular around the world and let us have a look at few big names.

Raul Gonzalez Blanco was born in Madrid, Spain on June 27, 1977. On the club level, Raul as a member of Real Madrid is the most impressive soccer player who was responsible for the victory in Champions League in 1998. Again, in 2002, he was the leading player who allowed Real Madrid to win the Champions league. He was a real hero in the whole tournament and scored the famous two goals that turned the whole situation of the game.

The famous Spanish soccer players include names of world famous goalkeepers. Ricardo Zamora was named as the best goalkeeper in 1958. The place of Zamora has remained unchallenged and not a single goalkeeper in Spain is able to reach his height. He is the greatest goalkeeper produced by Spain and played with the national team for more than 46 occasions. Also, he played for both Barcelona and Real Madrid. Spain has managed to provide steady goalkeepers like Luis Arconada and Andoni Zubizarreta. Edson Arantes Do Nascimento also nicked as Pele, is regarded as one of the famous Spanish soccer players of all time.

Most of the star players from around the world are involved in the famous Spanish soccer players list. The players signed by Real Madrid include big names such as Roberto Carlos, David Beckham, Zinedine Zidane, Ronaldo, Robinho, and so on. To add on the world famous Barcelona soccer club granted Spanish nationality to Brazilian world famous player Ronaldinho and Mexican player Giovani.

The world cup winning captain of Argentina, Diego Maradona is related to world famous Spanish club Barcelona. The other famous players related to Barcelona club are Marcelo Trobbiani, Alberto Acosta, Marcelo Saralegui, Nicolas Hernandez, etc. Barcelona club from Spain is considered to be one of the top 10 clubs in the world.

Though the Spain soccer national team is not successful on international level, the Spanish soccer has got great respect on world sports platform. The Spanish soccer has great future and the list of famous Spanish soccer players is definitely going to rise in coming years.

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EUFA Champions League History – Everything You Need to Know About UEFA Championship League

EUFA Champions League is world famous football league held every year, where champions of every European country leagues from last year are group in this awesome UEFA Championship League to play a win the trophy that will declare them the best Football Team of Europe.

Therefore this is a multi-million tournament! New stars and born in this most awaiting football event and this is why all football/soccer fans love to watch, enjoy and bet on this event.

Inter Milan is the current UEFA Championship League trophy holder; they beat Bayern Munich 2-0 in the last Champions League finals.

Real Madrid is the team who won the most UEFA Championship League, they left this trophy 9 times (1956, 1957, 1958, 1959, 1960, 1966, 1998, 2000, 2002), followed by AC Milan who won 7 times (1963, 1969, 1989, 1990, 1994, 2003, 2007) and Liverpool who won 5 times (1977, 1978, 1981, 1984, 2005).

Bayern Munich and Ajax both won 4 times, Bayern Munich in (1974, 1975, 1976, 2001) and Ajax in (1971, 1972, 1973, 1995).

Barcelona, Inter Milan and Manchester United won 3 times each. Barcelona in (1992, 2006, 2009), Inter Milan in (1964, 1965, 2010) and Manchester United in (1968, 1999, 2008).

Benfica, Juventus, Nottingham Forest and Porto won 2 times in tournament; Benfica in (1961, 1962), Juventus in (1985, 1996), Nottingham Forest in (1979, 1980) and Porto in (1987, 2004).

Celtic, Hamburg, Steaua BucureYti, Marseille, Feyenoord, Aston Villa, PSV Eindhoven, Red Star Belgrade and Borussia Dortmund won 1 time each.

Meaning 4 British teams: Liverpool, Machester United, Nottingham Forest and Aston Vila have won this competition. Followed by 3 Italian teams: Ac Milan, Inter Milan and Juventus and 3 German teams: Bayern Munich, Hamburg and Borussia Dortmund.

The reason why I am writing this is because this is crucial data that can help to predict which team from which country got better odds to win the next UEFA Championship League.

Heavy better usually really on this sort of data (plus experience). It is estimated that over 100 million bets are placed every year over UEFA Championship League.

I cannot say which team will win the next Champions League, however based from this crucial data I can say that a team from Britain as better chances to win the next Champions League as a team from Romania; since the only Romanian team (Steaua BucureYti) won only 1 Champions league so far. Where 4 strong British teams such as: Liverpool, Manchester United, Nottingham Forest and Aston Vila won 11 times in total.

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