Busyholism Test

While perusing Maria Nemeth’s excellent book The Energy of Money, I came across a phrase I’d never heard before but described my lifestyle far too well for my liking – «Busyholism». Take this «Busyholism Inventory» adapted from the book. (If you’re too busy to take it, you may as well assume you are one and skip ahead to the suggestions which follows!):

Use the following scale to score:

1 = not true at all

2 = somewhat untrue

3 = don’t know

4 = somewhat true

5 = absolutely true

1. I am tired most of the time.

2. I always seem to be in motion.

3. Most of the people in my life (spouse, friends, family) don’t appreciate all I have to do.

4. I get very frustrated if I cannot finish a task or if I’m interrupted and I have to put it off until later.

5. On Sunday (or my day off) I have a list of things I must do before I can play or rest. I rarely get to the play and rest part.

6. I often feel isolated from those I love.

7. By the time I do something I like, I am too tired to really enjoy it.

8. I feel guilty when I am resting or just taking it easy.

9. When I am doing something (such as watching a son or daughter play soccer), I often miss out on the fun because I am too preoccupied with what needs to be done next.

10. I use substances such as caffeine or sugar to prod myself into action during the day, and turn to alcohol, marijuana, or other drugs (prescription or over-the-counter) to relax in the evening.

11. I feel resentful because I am not doing the things I really want to do.

12. I feel that I have more responsibilities than most of my family or friends.

13. I usually do things in a hurry, like gulp my food or throw on clothes.

14. I forget to take care of myself (do not eat, drink water, or use the rest room) for long periods of time.

15. My friends and family tell me they are not seeing enough of me. Or, when I am with them, they tell me I seem withdrawn or emotionally removed.

There are no ‘Cosmo Quiz’ score totals to compare yourself with, but suffice it to say if you identify with any of the above descriptions, you’ll benefit from the suggestions which follow…

1. Take a day out

(Notice I didn’t say a day «off» – that’d never happen, would it?)

Taking a day out to overview your life direction, meaning, and purpose is one of the most powerfully productive things you can do, so even we confirmed busyholics can often justify it to ourselves.

For maximum impact, remove yourself completely from your home and work environment to minimize the siren call of busy distractions. Let’s face it, it’s easier to not answer e-mail or take phone calls when you’re nowhere near a computer or telephone!

2. Slow down and smell the cheese

When my daughter was two, her favourite song was called ‘Slow down and Smell the Cheese’. In the song, a frantic mouse named Tutter is running everywhere, pushing his cheese around the mouse hole, when he finally calls out in exhaustion, ‘So little time, so much cheese to push around!’

Just for today, spend time in the slow lane, literally and metaphorically. Leave yourself some extra time this morning, and drive to work in the slow lane. If you travel by train or bus, make a deal with yourself that you will not rush to catch the next one, no matter what.

As the mouse’s friend, a bear named, appropriately enough, ‘Bear’, sings, ‘Life is so much better when you smell the Feta!’

3. Get support

While there are no official support groups for ‘Busyholism’ (let’s face it, we’re all too busy to attend the meetings!), you can create your own support system. This week, experiment with getting support by making sure that you ask for support at least three times each day – even if (especially if!) you feel like you don’t need it.

Have fun, learn heaps, and chill out!

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How To Keep Your Soccer Cleats In Top Shape

Soccer cleats may not have the ability to make you a better player, but they definitely bring out the best in you because you are able to make use of your skills appropriately. There are so many cleats available in the market today and you should make the right choice in terms of fit, comfort, materials and even the features to enjoy a rewarding session in the field. But it is one thing to buy the perfect pair and quite another if you do not take care of your soccer boots. Keeping your cleats in top shape enhances durability and quality and it is not that hard to keep them in top shape.

1. Avoid the myth of hot water technique to loosen the soccer boots because it ruins the shoe even though it does loosen and expand them to give you a good fit. Instead, choosing other better breaking in techniques such as jogging in them during warm ups or prior to the game. The more activities you engage while wearing the boots, the more they loosen and the better the fit when you finally go to play.

2. If you want to soften your leather soccer cleats, then choose a high quality leather food. You can apply it to the boots after cleaning suitably one day before your game. The softer the boots the more comfortable the fit will be and the easier the movement on the pitch.

3. For natural leather cleats, polishing with creams is enough in ensuring that they do not dry out. They need this kind of conditioning to maintain softness and you can rub the cream after cleaning and drying the shoes. When they remain soft, cracking and hardening is eliminated.

4. Air dries the cleats after every game and avoid situations where you leave them in your bag till it is next practice day. You can stuff some newspaper into the soccer boats to soak up dampness inside and to hold them in shape as they dry. It is also important that you do not expose them to direct sunlight when drying or areas that are too hot because it can end up cracking them.

5. Remove the cleats out immediately after the game; the only place to wear them should be on the field. Hard surfaces such as concrete and asphalt can wear the spikes down, making them less functional in offering you grip during play.

6. Clean the soccer boots as soon as possible after the game so you are able to avoid grime and dirt settling into the leather causing damage in the process. When cleaning, you need to also ensure that you clean out every inch of the boot including dented areas as a result of stitching.

7. Use gentle cleaning products that will not damage the shoe and affect the breathability. The cleaning method and the cleaning products should be as gentle as possible to keep your shoe in top shape for longer.

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FIFA World Cup – Interesting Facts!

1930

Did you know- Uruguayan squad, the host country’s team,claimed the first-ever Men’s World Cup title over Argentina, 4-2.

1934

Did you know- At the II World Cup, Italy, host country, became the first European squad to win a global tournament. The subsequent tournaments were held as follows: 1938 in Paris (France, Europe), 1950 in Rio de Janeiro (Brazil, Latin America), 1958 in Stockholm (Sweden, Europe), 1962 in Santiago (Chile, Latin America), 1966 in London (England, Europe), 1970 in Mexico City (Mexico, Latin America), 1974 in Munich (West Germany, Europe), 1978 in Buenos Aires (Argentina, South America), 1982 in Barcelona (Spain, Europe), 1986 in Mexico City (Mexico, North America), 1990 in Rome (Italy, Europe), 1994 in Los Angeles (USA, North America), 1998 in Paris (France, Europe), 2002 in Seoul and Tokyo (South Korea & Japan, Asia), 2006 in Munich (Germany, Europe).

1950

Did you know- Bolivia competed in 1950 but not again until 1994 in the United States of America.

1974

Did you know- For the first time, West Germany hosted the global tournament in July 1974. Historically Germany had been competitive in soccer. Under the leadership Franz («Kaiser») Beckenbauer, the host country-which never finished below sixth place since 1954– won the X FIFA World Tournament. Outside of the Berlin Olympics (1936) and the Munich Games (1972), this event was the largest ever held in Germany.

1978

Did you know- Tunisia (Africa) placed ninth at the 1978 FIFA World Championship in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

1982

Did you know- At the 1982 FIFA World Tournament in Madrid (Spain), New Zealand, a rugby-loving nation, had the worst result for its region -Oceania- in World Cup’s history. Unfortunately NZ placed 23rd. For the country, it was its first appearance in the universal event.

1990

Did you know- At the 1990 FIFA World Championship in Europe,Cameroon’s football player Roger Milla, one of sub-Saharan Africa’s most respected footballers in the 20th century, helped his team towards eighth position, the best result ever for an African country in soccer history.

2002- 2010

Did you know- Brazil -one of the world’s biggest democracies– has historically been competitive in football since the 1950s.The soccer players from Brazil have conquered five out of eighteen tournaments: Sweden’58, Chile’62, Mexico’70, USA’94 and South Korea & Japan’02. In 1950 and 1998, Brazil was runner-up. By 2010, the Latin American nation is attempting to become the first country to win six World Cup titles in football history.

2010

Did you know- The 19th global tournament will be held in South Africa, one of the youngest members of the FIFA. It’ll be the largest event ever held in Africa. There’s only event that rivals the FIFA World Cup: the Summer Olympics.

FIFA World Cup Background

The FIFA World Cup has taken place every four years since its first tournament in 1930 – with the exception of 1942 and 1946 due to World War II – between the senior men’s national soccer teams of the Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA). Since its inaugural tournament, the FIFA World Cup – now also known as the Soccer World Cup, the Football World Cup, or simply the World Cup – has become the most widely viewed sports championship in the world, with an even larger television audience than the Olympic Games.

Since 1977 FIFA has also organized youth equivalents of the international tournament, as well as club football equivalents and equivalents for soccer variations including futsal and beach soccer. In 1991, FIFA also introduced a women’s soccer equivalent to the World Cup, called the FIFA Women’s World Cup, the first of which took place in the People’s Republic of China between twelve nations and was won by the United States and which now takes place between sixteen teams over the course of three weeks.

When the world’s first international soccer match had taken place in 1872, in Glasgow between Scotland and England, the creators of the game – as well as by the time the first international soccer tournament, the first British Home Championship, had taken place twelve years later in 1884 between Scotland and Ireland – the sport had still yet to gain much international attention and was played very little outside of the U.K. Nevertheless, the beginnings of soccer’s international popularity were budding. As other nations did come to acknowledge the sport in the years that followed, it was still only regarded as a demonstration sport, especially when it came to the Olympic Games; during the 1900 and 1904 Olympics, it was played as an event, but without the awarding of any medals.

In 1904, the Federation Internationale de Football Association (FIFA) was founded in Paris as an official, organized international governing body that would represent the interests and advancement of soccer worldwide, and among its first orders of business was to attempt to establish a truly international soccer tournament outside of the context of the Olympics, although it took years for them to successfully achieve that goal. The World Cup would become the premiere international sporting event culminating in the most coveted sports award in the world.

Since 1966, each FIFA WC tournament has had its own mascot, typically reflective in some way of the given year’s host country; and more recently, each WC has also had its own specially designed official match balls for each year. The first mascot was World Cup Willie, a lion representative of that year’s hosts, England, wearing a Union Flag Jersey which read «World Cup.» In 1970, the mascot was Juanito, a young boy clad in a kit and sombrero, as Mexico was the host of that year’s Cup. Since then, other mascots have included Naranjito (an orange) for Spain in 1982; Pique (a jalapeno pepper) for Mexico when they hosted again in 1986; Ciao (an Italian tri-color stick figure for Italy in 1990; Striker, the WC Pup for the United States in 1994; Footix (a rooster) for France in 1998, and Zakumi (a leopard) for South Africa in 2010.